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Awkwardly euphemistic

Comment on the article Vladimir Putin bans comparisons between Soviets and Nazi Germany in Second World War by Tom Parfitt in The Times, 1 July 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 12 July 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times 12 July 2021

‘The latter is likely to anger former Soviet states like Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, which say they were occupied by the Red Army and then coerced into joining the Soviet Union against their will.’

The Times follows the Communist narrative, which avoids any mention of occupation of Poland by Soviet Russia. The phrase ‘coerced into joining … against their will’ is awkwardly euphemistic. We are talking here about murder, torture, concentration camps. The use of ‘former Soviet states’ is inappropriate. They didn’t have any sovereignty.

Note also the following:

‘In response, Mateusz Morawiecki, Poland’s prime minister, called Putin a liar.’

This is a non-essential criticism from Polish PM. By calling Putin a liar Morawiecki avoided giving proper response, which would be to recall the Communist terror unleashed against Polish citizens, such as my family members, in eastern Poland occupied by Soviet Russia. Contemporary Polish ruling class follows unmistakably the same Communist narrative, in which eastern Poland and its citizens are to be erased.

@LechSBorkowski

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Monuments to Dzerzhinsky in Russia

Comment on the article Lenin’s architect of red terror rises again by Ben Macintyre in The Times, 16 September 2017.


I used Google Maps recently to try and locate monuments to Felix Dzerzhinsky in Russia. There is lots of them all over the country. Here is a sample. The tweets quoted below are part of a thread, where I provide coordinates and pictures, courtesy of Google, of this organizer of the Communist secret police.

Public space in Russia is as Soviet and Communist as ever. Most of the articles from Russia ignore this most basic information.

Moscow (two statues), Sankt Petersburg, Saratov, Ufa, Volgograd (two), Taganrog, Kirov, Krasnoyarsk, Novosibirsk, Dzerzhinsk, Oryol, Kursk…

Kirov has a shopping centre named after him. Numerous streets, squares.

Then there is the monument to Stalin unveiled in Yakutsk in 2013.

Absolutely horrible.

@LechSBorkowski

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BBC documentary Borrowed Pasture 1960

Polish version: Film BBC Pożyczone Pastwisko z 1960

Borrowed Pasture 1960 BBC documentary directed by John Ormond, narrated by Richard Burton
Borrowed Pasture 1960 BBC documentary directed by John Ormond, narrated by Richard Burton

The men in the BBC documentary Borrowed Pasture, Eugeniusz Okołowicz, photographer, and Włodzimierz Bułaj, electrician, were in the Polish Army during September 1939 campaign of WWII, then crossed into Lithuania where they were interned, to avoid capture by either Germans or Russians. Soviets occupied Lithuania in Spring 1940 and transferred the interned Poles to Russian camps. My wife’s grandfather Aleksander Głuchowski was also among them.

Włodzimierz Bułaj, electrician, former Polish Army WWII soldier, at the Penygaer Farm in Carmarthenshire, Wales, in 1960 documentary Borrowed Pasture
Włodzimierz Bułaj, electrician, former Polish Army WWII soldier, at the Penygaer Farm in Carmarthenshire, Wales, in 1960 documentary Borrowed Pasture
Eugeniusz Okołowicz, photographer, former Polish Army WWII soldier, at the Penygaer Farm in Carmarthenshire, Wales, in 1960 documentary Borrowed Pasture
Eugeniusz Okołowicz, photographer, former Polish Army WWII soldier, at the Penygaer Farm in Carmarthenshire, Wales, in 1960 documentary Borrowed Pasture

The camps, where Włodzimierz/Wlodek Bułaj was held, marked with yellow pins on the enclosed map:

Lithuania, Wiłkomierz
Russia:
Yukhnov, Kaluga Oblast, from 15 July 1940
Ponoy in the Kola Peninsula, Murmansk Oblast, from 6 June 1941
Yuzha, Ivanovo Oblast

Camps, where Eugeniusz Okołowicz was held are marked by blue pins:

Lithuania, Mejszagoła
Russia:
Kozielsk/Kozelsk, from 13 July 1940
Gryazovets, Vologda Oblast, from 2 July 1941 to 3 September 1941

Orange pin is the location of Tatishchevo, Saratov Oblast, where both men arrived in September 1941. This was one of the meeting points for Polish soldiers and their dependants after they were released from the Soviet camps, following the German attack on the Soviet Union in June 1941.

Locations associated with Włodzimierz Bułaj and Eugeniusz Okołowicz, Soviet camps 1940-1941
Locations associated with Włodzimierz Bułaj and Eugeniusz Okołowicz. Green pin – the Penygaer Farm in Wales, yellow pins – camps, where Włodzimierz Bułaj was held in 1939-1941, blue pins – camps, where Eugeniusz Okołowicz was held in 1939-1941, orange pin – Tatishchevo, one of meeting points for Polish soldiers released from captivity by Russians following the German attack in 1941.

Note the location of the Ponoy camp at the tip of the Kola Peninsula. It is a barren tundra in an uninhabited land, very far from any human settlements. Soviets referred to it as the ‘Ponoy point’. Number of prisoners at this location was about 4 thousand. Many of them would be dead during the following months, had they been kept there longer. NKVD documents state the POWs were to be used for the construction of an airfield. It is obvious, however, that the death toll would be enormous. That was probably the aim: to kill by exhaustion and hunger.

My wife’s grandfather was in the same camps of Kozielsk/Kozelsk and Gryazovets as Okołowicz. Thousands of earlier Polish POWs from the Kozielsk camp were murdered by the Russians at the Katyn site near Smolensk in April and May 1940. Returning to Poland under Communist/Soviet control after the war was therefore very risky. Many of the Poles interned in Lithuania and later in the Soviet camps lived in eastern Poland, which was occupied by the Soviet Union after the war. This was the case of Głuchowski and could be the case of Bułaj and Okołowicz as well.

Aleksander Głuchowski arrived in Poland in 1947 to reunite with his son he last saw in 1939, his wife having died of hunger, exhaustion and disease in 1945. He was arrested by the Communist secret police and imprisoned. He died in 1952 at the age of 45.

The 22 December 1959 edition of Western Mail (Glamorgan County) noted that cameraman William Greenhaigh served at the mass celebrated at the farm:

Wearing gumboots, he recently served at a Roman Catholic Mass for two elderly Poles on a remote farm in Carmarthenshire.

The BBC Welsh television unit, of which he is a member, was on location, shooting scenes for “Borrowed Pastures” – featuring Polish farmers who have left their native land to settle in Wales.

Coventry Evening Telegraph, 15 June 1960, in the article Tribute to Courage of Polish Farmers:

A happy ending has been provided to one of the most fascinating human interest stories in recent years, which began when about 100 Welsh farms passed into the possession of Polish Ex-Servicemen at the end of the war.

 

Two such people were Eugeniusz Okolowicz and Wlodek Bulaj, who borrowed enough money to buy infertile acres and ruined buildings of Penygaer Farm, Trawsmawr, Carmarthen, which had stood abandoned for 20 years.

 

Neither knew much about farming, but they managed to clear a mountain stream to an old mill and harness a generator. Living on a few groceries and two tins of meat a week, they built up a small herd of cattle and found market for the milk. Also, they found an old tractor, which they bought for £4 10s.

 

Today, they still work 18 hours a day; their only contact with the rest of the world being a weekly rendezvous with a travelling grocer, and a six-monthly visit of a Polish priest.

[…]
The courageous battle of these two men was spotlighted last month in the film, “Borrowed Pasture”, shown on BBC TV, and the Hawker Siddeley Group offered the two farmers one of its new aero-dynamically designed Gloster forage harvesters, worth some £300. An offer which was speedily accepted.

 

The presentation of the Harvester – built by the same experts who designed Gloster Javelin and Gloster Meteor jet fighters – was made at Penygaer Farm yesterday by a Gloster board member, Mr. W. W. W. Downing.

Coventry Evening Telegraph, 15 June 1960, article Tribute to Courage of Polish Farmers
From the Coventry Evening Telegraph, 15 June 1960, article Tribute to Courage of Polish Farmers

On Friday, January 6 1961, The South Wales Gazette, Monmouthshire, noted

The BBC Film Unit’s presentation of “Borrowed Pasture” which can be seen on Wednesday, attracted a great deal of attention when it was shown in May last year […]

 

The film, written and produced by John Ormond, tells the story of two former soldiers in the Polish Army, who settled in a bleak decaying farm on a Carmarthenshire hill-side. […]

 

The film’s most moving passage deals with loneliness of Wlodek Bulaj, one of the farmers. Bulaj has not seen his wife for 22 years.

John set about the task of helping Bulaj to get Polish and British visas for Mrs Bulaj to come to Wales.

 

Viewers who had seen the film sent money to help. After months of delay, Mrs Bulaj is now at the farm, having been reunited with her husband in Ormond’s own home. Now she can stay in Britain indefinitely.

The article mentions ‘Polish and British visas for Mrs Bulaj’. This may indicate that the family lived in eastern Poland, occupied by the Soviet Union after WWII.

Here is the scene from the film, in which Włodek is looking at his family pictures. The little daughter he last saw in 1939 has just got married.

BBC 1960 documentary Borrowed Pasture, Włodzimierz Bułaj is looking at pictures of family last seen twenty years earlier
BBC 1960 documentary Borrowed Pasture, Włodzimierz Bułaj is looking at pictures of family last seen twenty years earlier
BBC 1960 documentary Borrowed Pasture, Włodzimierz Bułaj is looking at his daughter's wedding picture
BBC 1960 documentary Borrowed Pasture, Włodzimierz Bułaj is looking at his daughter’s wedding picture

However, in 1963, a little over two years after the reunion with his wife, Włodzimierz Bułaj died. What happened to his wife, Mr. Okołowicz, and the farm?

The personal dimension of the story is closely linked with the Communist policy of elimination and separation of anyone not willing to serve the totalitarian system. I mentioned my wife’s grandfather, who was prevented from reuniting with his son, my father in law, and imprisoned upon arrival in Poland in 1947.

Farms of my grandparents on both sides in eastern Poland were seized by Soviet authorities after WWII. Nearly entire family on my mother’s side were sent to concentration camps in different parts of the Soviet Union. Some were tortured. My parents met in the camps. Later on, in the 1980s, Soviet authorities refused permission for my visit to the family still remaining in the Soviet-occupied territory. In 2015, after many years of harassment, my wife and I were expelled from our workplaces at the State School of Music in Zielona Góra and University in Poznań, respectively. Despite official proclamations, the Communist policies continue. I am now in London in the UK, where I came in 2016, while my wife remains in Poland. The story of Bułaj, Okołowicz, Głuchowski, and others like them is not over. It continues.

https://twitter.com/LechSBorkowski
https://lsborkowski.com/pol/

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Production of fake narratives

Comment on the article We must support the citizens of Belarus during this brutal state crackdown by Renatas Norkus, Arkady Rzegocki, and Dr Jonathan Eyal in The Sunday Telegraph 7 February 2021. Polish version: Produkcja fałszywych narracji.

[1] Lithuanian Ambassador to the UK

[2] Polish Ambassador to the UK

[3] Associate Director at the Royal United Services Institute


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Sunday Telegraph 8 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Sunday Telegraph 8 February 2021

8 Feb 2021 12:21AM

“Just like Poland, whose solidarity movement four decades ago sparked a series of revolutions ending Soviet rule in Central and Eastern Europe and paved the way for a peaceful transition to democracy in the region at the end of the 1980s”

This is a false statement and a key element of recent mythology. The Solidarity movement was organised by the Communist regime in order to create excuse for moving to the next stage of dictatorship, dictatorship ‘below-the-line’. In this next phase, the repressive acts are more carefully hidden and masked. There is, however, a clear evidence of continued abuse, if you know where to look.

Leading members of the Polish ‘opposition’ came from within the regime itself.

The West failed disastrously to decode even the most basic elements of this comedy.

The Polish state continues to use Communist methods and violate human rights. In 2015, the state authorities issued a fake statement that my pianist wife Małgorzata Głuchowska cannot continue as a piano teacher in a state school of music and must be fired. The documents fabricated by the Regional Centre for Occupational Medicine in Zielona Góra in what is now western Poland, contain a a Soviet-style statement by a psychologist accusing my wife of unspecified delusions. These are Communist methods which the West chooses not to see and not to report. The sound recordings of two conversations with the psychologist, to which my wife was subjected under the threat of losing her job, are available on Youtube. The top Polish authorities received detailed information about our case, but chose to protect the perpetrators.

Our family is targeted because my parents were prisoners of Communist concentration camps in northern Russia and I have always supported the hard choices they made. I was expelled from the Physics Dept. of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan in 2015 after two decades of harassment, bullying, and mistreatment. I have a PhD from an American university. You can read more here: https://lsborkowski.com/pol/

Lies, falsifications, and production of fake narratives, the entire mythology of a heroic ‘opposition’ are well rehearsed in Eastern Europe. There was no transition to honesty and authenticity. People are so used to lies and falsifications in everyday life that violating the laws does not bother anyone.

Similar comedy is being played in Belarus now. Those coming on the streets in Belarus fulfil regime’s wish.

The current article is also subordinated to the Communist/Russian narrative, from which the occupation of Eastern Poland by the Soviet Union since 1939 and the subsequent genocidal treatment of the Polish population and anyone resisting Communism is absent.

Belarus known today is a Communist creation. It has nothing to do with the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The ambassadors of Lithuania and Poland commit an act of historical forgery here.

My parents lived in Eastern Poland, which was later divided into Ukrainian, Belarussian and Lithuanian Soviet ‘Republics’. They were stripped of their Polish citizenship as a result of the illegal Yalta deal, conducted behind the back of the Polish government. Unfortunately, the governments of Great Britain and United States participated in this act, against the will of the people, although they had neither the moral nor legal right to do so.

https://twitter.com/lechsborkowski

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Komsomol rock

My comments on the article Joanna Stingray, the California girl who rocked Russia and spread the word by Marc Bennetts in The Times, 1 January 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment 1 The Times 1 January 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment 1, The Times 1 January 2021
Lech S Borkowski comment 2 The Times 1 January 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment 2, The Times 1 January 2021

Stingray stuffed reel-to-reel tapes and lyrics into her leather jacket and boots to evade Soviet customs guards. “I was so enchanted by the music that I was completely blind about the dangers of being caught,”

I am pretty sure she was under careful surveillance. If she managed to get tapes out of the Soviet Union, it was because she was allowed to. I am not saying she necessarily collaborated with the Soviet intelligence. Nevertheless, the Soviets must have decided it was in their interest to let the tapes out.

@LechSBorkowski

P.S. The article doesn’t dwell on such mundane bits as a permit to stay. These are the informative bits.


Grebenshchikov was a Komsomol member, the youth wing of the Communist Party. Presenting these guys as independent or contesting the system is ridiculous. Authorities had everything under control, including fabrication of fake dissidents. They played and recorded because the authorities wanted them to.

@LechSBorkowski

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Neural correlates of consciousness

My comment on Hitler and Stalin by Laurence Rees review: a tale of two tyrants by Robert Gerwarth in The Telegraph, 26 October 2020. Polish version: Neuronalne korelaty świadomości.


Lech S Borkowski comment on a book review by Robert Gerwarth in The Telegraph 26 October 2020
Lech S Borkowski, comment on “Hitler and Stalin by Laurence Rees book review” in The Telegraph, 26 October 2020

WWII and associated developments are typically viewed from mostly a military perspective. Started on [date], ended on [date]. [number] mln killed.

My family comes from eastern Poland, which suffered three occupations during WWII and afterwards: the Soviet one 1939-1941, the German 1941-1944 and again the Soviet one from 1944 on.

The war has not ended in 1945. My parents and other family members were imprisoned in concentrations camps in the Soviet Union for many years after WWII. One of my uncles was tortured to the point of not knowing his own name. He was permanently damaged. Technically alive, dead as a human being.

My mother suffered terribly as well. WWII was terrible enough, but the real hell came post-1945. The war against our family has never really ended. More recently, my wife and I were fired from our jobs in Poland in 2015, because the neural correlates of our consciousness exhibited features proscribed for elimination by the ruling class installed as a result of the Communist occupation.

Our families suffered from both Nazis and Communists. My wife’s grandfather fought against the German invasion in 1939, was later imprisoned by the Soviets in 1940-41, then fought with the Allies on the western front, and again imprisoned by the Communists when he returned to Poland in 1947.

While WWII understood as a military campaign ended in 1945, the violence associated with it continued in non-military forms against civilians. Poland understood as a civilization developed over the centuries, has been wiped out. Now the same name is being used by the Communist fake.

@LechSBorkowski

Research

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WWII history reduced to caricature

My second comment on Hitler and Stalin by Laurence Rees review by David Aaronovitch in The Times, 23 October 2020. Polish version: Druga wojna światowa zredukowana do karykatury.


Lech S Borkowski, WWII history reduced to caricature, comment The Times 26 October 2020
WWII history reduced to caricature, my comment on Hitler and Stalin by Laurence Rees book review, David Aaronovitch in The Times 26 October 2020

26 October 2020

I would like to return to the second paragraph of the review, on which I commented already earlier. The entire article is based on the concept of symmetry of the two dictatorships.

“One of the Polish cities the Soviets annexed was Lwow, which they incorporated into Ukraine.”

Ukrainian Soviet “republic”.

“As the German forces neared Lwow the local NKVD — the internal security police — massacred 4,000 political detainees in Brygidki prison. A few weeks later the occupying Germans egged on local Ukrainians to murder 4,000 Jews by way of retaliation. It was a bloody symmetry, of a kind.”

This is a misrepresentation. There is no symmetry here. Those killed by the Soviets were Polish citizens of Polish and Ukrainian ethnicity. Those killed by the Germans were also Polish citizens. Omitting their citizenship is beneficial to the Communist narrative. Soviet Union worked through their agents before WWII, such as the father of a contemporary prominent figure in the Polish media, on promoting support for the annexation of eastern Poland. The occupation by the Soviet Union of eastern Poland in 1939-1941 and again post-1944 was appropriately manipulated by Moscow. Declaring that Poland was dead, omitting the victims’ citizenship, and focusing on their ethnicity instead, while eliminating Poles from the picture, is part of that Communist narrative.

The Nazi occupiers also killed professors of the Polish universities in Lwów.

Poland was the only significant country which fought against both of these totalitarian states.

@LechSBorkowski

P.S. Note the captions under pictures of the dictators:

“Adolf Hitler always planned to attack the USSR”
“Joseph Stalin refused to listen to warnings about German aggression”

Communist caricature of WWII.

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Communist narrative of WWII in The Times

My comment on Hitler and Stalin by Laurence Rees review — bloody fantasy versus cruel rationalism, book review by David Aaronovitch in The Times, 23 October 2020. Polish version: Komunistyczna narracja drugiej wojny światowej w The Times.


Lech S Borkowski, comment on book review by David Aaronovitch in The Times 24 October 2020
Lech S Borkowski, comment on book review by David Aaronovitch in The Times 24 October 2020

This review starts with a caricature and is a bit of a caricature of history itself. It is a bad idea to use a cartoon to illustrate this subject. I understand, however, that the author is interested in conserving the narrative favorable towards the Communists. Although the cartoon uses insults about each of the leaders, it performs a very important function. It goes well with the grand Communist narrative.

A much better illustration would be the picture taken by a German soldier during the joint Communist-Nazi victory parade in Brześć nad Bugiem/Brest on the Bug river. It shows a banner praising the Red Army written in Cyrillic, two swastikas on each side above the banner, and a slightly raised sickle and hammer positioned centrally above the banner.

The picture is available in the German archives.

The author calls the Soviet leader a “defensive nationalist”. Imagine you heard this phrase out of context. Who would you have associated it with? Quite possibly you would have thought about leader of a western country.

This is another example of the Communist narrative, in which Soviet Union is to be presented as a defensive power, not the bloody genocidal regime that it was.

Also, note the language of the following fragment:

“As the German forces neared Lwow the local NKVD — the internal security police — massacred 4,000 political detainees in Brygidki prison. A few weeks later the occupying Germans egged on local Ukrainians to murder 4,000 Jews by way of retaliation. It was a bloody symmetry, of a kind.”

There was nothing “local” about NKVD. Decision to murder thousands of prisoners, citizens of Poland, was issued from Moscow. This is genocide and should be called this way. In the chaos of the first days of the German advance the Communists decided to give priority to killing the prisoners. The Soviet army retreated chaotically, abandoning equipment and arms along the way. They just could not retreat fast enough. The murder of the prisoners in eastern Poland, however, proceeded with precision and care.

@LechSBorkowski

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Communist narrative in The Sunday Times Travel section

My comment on the article Exploring Poland’s Lake District by Emma Thomson in The Sunday Times, 27 September 2020. Polish version: Narracja komunistyczna w The Sunday Times.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 27 September 2020
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times, 27 September 2020, part 1
Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 27 September 2020 part 2
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times, 27 September 2020, part 2

The article is representative of the Communist narrative. This is a region whose inhabitants either escaped or were expelled later in a totalitarian action. Practically the entire population of this large region was purged. The region was split by an arbitrarily drawn border and the Soviet enclave of “Kaliningrad” was installed north of it. The Koenigsberg of Immanuel Kant and several hundred years of history were annihilated.

“The capital of the region is the “garden town” of Olsztyn”

It is not a garden town. It is full of Communist blocks of flats. This was East Prussian Allenstein before WWII.

My wife’s grandmother Wera Głuchowska and her son Witold, my wife’s father, then a little boy, happened to be in Allenstein as refugees in 1945, just as WWII was coming to an end. Their home was in Iwacewicze, town in eastern Poland under Soviet occupation, presently under Belarussian control. Food was extremely scarce. Wera died of disease and exhaustion in 1945, after the war ended. She is buried in a neglected cemetery behind the church of St Joseph (current name, I am not sure of the German name). An office of the Polish Institute of National Remembrance is located just across the street from the church. The name is misleading, however. A short walk to this cemetery is enough to expose the lie. This has nothing to do with remembrance and everything with forgetting and subjugating to the official propaganda.

This cemetery bears witness to a great tragedy. Graves of little children who came to the world in the aftermath of WWII, graves of older Polish folk, who died in a foreign land instead near their farms in the fields, where they grew up and farmed. Graves of pre-WWII Prussian inhabitants, whose descendants fled, were killed, or were expelled. Most neglected, their boundaries sometimes difficult to recognize.

“The farm near Utka was bought by her great-grandparents for a small sum when the borders were redrawn after the Second World War. This previously German region became Polish, the Germans left, and residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south.”

The name of the place in Polish is Ukta, not Utka. It is quite an achievement to falsify so much history in two sentences. “Borders were redrawn”? By whom? Who did that? Why? No mention of an illegal Yalta agreement to which, sadly, the British government were part.

The phrase “bought by her great-grandparents” is meant to suggest a legal transaction as well as create an air of a long Polish history of the place. The sentence “This previously German region became Polish, the Germans left, and residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south” is a classic example of a totalitarian story-telling. The tragedy of the people is presented like a simple house sale. It was anything but.

This is the Communist narrative subordinated to the Soviet/Russian narrative.

The phrase “residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south” is simply a lie. I am a son of those “residents”. They were indeed residents, but not of Lithuania. Post-WWII, they resided in Communist concentration camps in northern Russia, Arkhangelsk region, for quite a long time. They were lucky to get out alive. Before that, they were citizens of Poland. They were stripped of their Polish citizenship by the Soviet occupiers. Both of my parents lived in eastern Poland, now marked as part of Belarus.

I was born in Kętrzyn/Rastenburg and grew up among refugee families from eastern Poland. We had a very small flat in former German barracks. Among our neighbours was a quiet German-East Prussian family. They may have been evicted from their house or farm. They left for Germany in the 1970s. Two of my childhood friends also moved to Germany during that time. They had a Polish father and a German mother.

As time went by, I gradually realised the enormity of the tragedy of all the people in that war.

And what are we served by The Times? No mention of vandalised country houses, ruined farms. It is all sweet and beautiful. “Bought for a small sum”. Really? This area is not my place and not my heritage.

@LechSBorkowski

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Contempt for victims

My comment on the article My great aunt, the spy Ursula Kuczynski by Rosa Ellis in The Times, 11 September 2020.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times  12 September 2020
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times 12 September 2020

Here are my reflections.

We are served a story of a family of intellectuals who worked for the genocidal Communist regime and who don’t care about responsibility for their actions. It seems they are very happy with what they did.

Victims of Communism are simply eliminated from the narrative. I read this as an expression of contempt for the victims.

I also have a family and three generations of my family suffered terribly under the Communist terror.

More recently, my pianist wife and I, a physics PhD, were fired from state institutions in Poland. The authorities ran an extremely vicious campaign against us. They employed typical Communist methods. Do our lives matter?

Also, I would like to correct the view expressed in some earlier comments that the Soviet Union was a British ally during part of WWII. That’s not true.

It is true that the British government and the British people viewed the Soviet Union as an ally, but this view was based on deception and self-deception. Soviet Union never ceased to be the enemy of western democracies.

@LechSBorkowski

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