Concentration camp Poland

My third comment following the article Benefits boom pushes Polish populists to victory by Oliver Moody in The Times, 14 October 2019.


This is a response to those uncritically accepting the well-known widely publicized narrative.

To present a narrative, especially one contrary to the widely publicized one, it does take a little longer to experience, analyze and assess. And I and my wife have done that. We have documents and texts to show for it.

The Communist devil is in the details. The necessary condition is to think critically, ask questions, verify, interact with the authorities by e.g. writing letters etc.

I recommend reading our texts at lsborkowski.com/pol/

They are available for everyone to see.

We also have some sound recordings. At the top of my Twitter feed is currently pinned a sound clip from my visit to the Ministry of Culture in Warsaw, Center for Artistic Education, 23 October 2012. This was at the time when Donald Tusk was the Prime Minister and another former ‘dissident’ and a recent MEP Bogdan Zdrojewski was the Minister of Culture. One of the lawyers in the legal section of the Center threatened me with hurting my ‘paws’ during my attempt to make notes during the few minutes when I had access to a document produced by a representative of the Ministry.

We documented falsifications and violations of law. We also raised our voice against it.

We were both expelled from our jobs in the Autumn of 2015, my wife from the State School of Music in Zielona Góra and I from the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań for contradicting the imposed fake narrative, for using our rights theoretically declared in the constitution of 1997.

My wife, the best piano teacher in the School’s piano section, with many professional achievements, was declared to be psychologically unfit for the job. After twenty years of an impeccable and a very successful service. The authorities used against her a typical Communist method. The Communist Labor Code introduced in 1974, contains provision for compulsory health checks by the specialized branch of the health service: Occupational Health Service.

In 1996, the Minister of Health issued an ordinance allowing the functionaries of the Occupational Health Service to request unspecified and unrestricted additional health checks. The employee is not allowed to continue in his/her current occupation, unless he or she shows an approval from the Occupational Health Service. Much like in a concentration camp. The camp physician decides, whether you can continue to work, and therefore to live, or whether you should be fired and your life ought to be terminated.

Why such an obvious totalitarian tool escaped attention of journalists, scholars, politicians? We sent hundreds of letters to the top officials and MPs in Poland and have not received a single meaningful answer.

My wife was forced to go to a psychologist under the threat of losing her job. Everyone knows that there is no method to assess psychologically whether someone is fit for the job of a pianist and piano teacher. After two approximately 40-45 minute conversations the psychologist issued an ‘opinion’ that Malgorzata Gluchowska suffers from unspecified delusions and is unfit for the job she performed so successfully for over twenty years. Sounds like the Soviet Union, doesn’t it?

We have got sound recordings of these conversations. We have sent transcripts to the authorities. We sent it to the Prime Minister Morawiecki, the Prosecutor General Zbigniew Ziobro, to other members of the cabinet and to the MPs. You can read the transcript online. Part of recording is also available there. And the entire recording is ready to be used in the criminal proceedings against the members of the Occupational Medical Service as well as against other members of the state hierarchy. The state’s top officials protect criminals masquerading as a health service.

It is obvious that this action had the approval and protection at the very top. The participants must have been assured of impunity and of being rewarded for it, otherwise they wouldn’t have dared to undertake such a bold action.

The prosecuting authority falsified the proceedings in a typical Communist manner.

My parents were imprisoned in Communist concentration camps in the Soviet Union for their convictions and standing up against it. My father deserted from the Communist army in January 1945. He was sentenced by the NKVD War Tribunal to ten years in the camp. My mother’s family supported anti-Communist resistance in Eastern Poland, which was occupied by the Soviet Union after 1944. She was imprisoned from 1949 to 1956. That was real opposition to Communism.

The Solidarity trade union and other ‘opposition’ movements of the 1970s and the 1980s in Poland were fake.

@LechSBorkowski

Oka flowing wide in the Vatican

My second comment following the article Benefits boom pushes Polish populists to victory by Oliver Moody in The Times, 14 October 2019.


Cardinal Wojtyla wouldn’t have advanced to the top of the church hierarchy without Communist support. The church in Poland quickly lost its independence after WWII. The Communist control was total.

In October 2004, the Red Army Choir gave a special performance in the Vatican during the celebration of the 26th anniversary of his pontificate. The last song performed that evening was “Oka”, the hymn of the Polish Communist army units formed in the Soviet Union under the Soviet control. There is nothing accidental about it. The performance was televised to Italy and Russia. Press correspondents noted that the pope was ‘visibly moved’. Ha ha. Visibly moved, sure.

He did come to the Vatican from a ‘faraway place’ indeed as he declared in his speech right after becoming the pope.

He did not want to pray for the Polish officers murdered by the Soviet NKVD in Katyn in 1940.

‘Very instrumental in the downfall of the Iron Curtain’. These are just empty slogans.

Communist capitalists

On 9 October 2019, The Times published the article Putin’s enemy Mikhail Khodorkovsky on Citizen K, the film that tells his story. Here are my comments posted on the newspaper’s website.

Comment 2 is a response to another reader’s post, who argued that

1. careers in politics or economy were reserved for the Communist party members.

2. “after the regime change the people who were best placed to become political and business leaders were the ones who had worked their way up under the old system.” This was argued to be entirely logical. Some dissidents have also made good careers but there enough of them to replace the incumbents.

3. The same thing happened in Germany after WWII, where only the top Nazis were purged.


Comment 1

Isn’t it funny that throughout entire Communist block the best way to achieve capitalist and/or political success is to be a Communist or come from Communist circles?

Khodorkovsky’s story is not credible.

Knowing how stories are fabricated in Poland, for example, where Communists where presented as liberals, enlightened democrats and pro-capitalist, I would remain highly skeptical of the article’s subject.

Comment 2

Paragraph 1. You suggest a surprisingly limited scope of control exercised by the Communist dictatorship. Only two areas of activity are mentioned, politics and economy. What about the judiciary, the military, lawlessness enforcement (not to be confused with the law enforcement in a normal country), education, science, etc.? Was there an area of activity remaining outside a strict control?

There was not.

Also religion was no exception.

Paragraph 2. “So of course after the regime change …”. What regime change? You mean the new guys, who are the same as the old guys? There was no regime change. Change was superficial and involved mostly the stage props. The control remained in the same hands.

The “leading dissidents” were performing the roles assigned to them by the Communists. In Poland the entire Solidarity movement of the 1970s and 1980s was created by the Communists themselves. The dissidents were fake.

The future “capitalist reformer”, “author of the big-bang transition to capitalism” was an earlier member of the Communist party and a former employee of the Institute of the Fundamental Problems of Marxism and Leninism in Warsaw.

I remember how some years ago the Polish Minister of Internal Affairs at the time and a former Communist Party member explained that those working in the Communist secret services where natural partners of western businesses, because of their knowledge and qualifications.

You write “it is entirely logical”. Whose logic do you follow?

The last sentence of Paragraph 2 contradicts the first one.

There was no regime change. The regime hasn’t changed not only at the top, but in the middle and in the lower layers of the hierarchy as well. In other words, the Communist system of the selection of the cadres remained firmly in place. These cadres remained fully operational in the same sense as before 1990. They are fully operational today. I happen to know this first-hand.

Paragraph 3. “The same thing happened in Germany after the war.” No, it has not. Germany after WWII and the Communist countries post-1990 are two different things.

@LechSBorkowski

Polish Minds in Fetters

My comment following Niall Ferguson’s article “Science fiction has become dystopian fact” in The Times, 22 September 2019, about 8:30 pm local time.


My earlier comment was blocked. I will try again.

I would encourage everyone to read “Russian Minds in Fetters”, London: George Allen and Unwin, by the Polish writer and statesman Stanisław Mackiewicz. There is also a more recent edition by Routledge, 2018. He applied to visit the Soviet Union through official channels and having finally received permission, traveled there in 1929. The book is an account of his experience during the trip. The book withstood the test of time remarkably well, as I had to acknowledge few years ago following my own and my family’s experience with the next stage of totalitarianism in Poland. I warmly recommend it.

While Orwell’s 1984 is a very valuable work of fiction, it is just that: a work of fiction. It should not be taken as a substitute for a real-life experience.

Huxley’s idea that the totalitarianism of the future is likely to be of the “love your servitude” type is generally correct, as is evident in Eastern Europe. Rumours about a democratic transition in countries such as Poland, for example, are vastly exaggerated.

There is an abundance of evidence contradicting the official dogma of the “democratic transition” in Eastern Europe. Let me give you just one example.

My wife was fired from her job of a pianist and piano teacher in the State School of Music in Zielona Góra in Poland in Autumn 2015, using a document fabricated by the Occupational Health Service. The document stated that my wife cannot continue performing her job for unspecified health reasons. The key was a psychologist’s opinion, who accused my wife of having unspecified “delusions”.

We have submitted detailed evidence to the Prime Minister of Poland and to the Minister of Justice, who is also the Prosecutor General. Other Ministers, the Minister of Health, and MPs were informed as well.

Everyone knows that there is no such thing as a scientifically valid procedure of assessment of someone’s psychological ability to do the job of a pianist and piano teacher (and almost any other job, save for the very few narrow tests). Everyone who received our correspondence is perfectly aware that a crime has been committed by the named health service ‘specialists’. We have sound recordings of my wife two conversations with the psychologist. We submitted this evidence to the country’s top authorities.

Nothing happened. Silence, save for the falsifications carried out by the local prosecutor office.

We have informed members of the European Parliament as well. Hundreds of them. No result.

The idea of Occupational Health Service was created under the Communist dictatorship. The officially declared aim of this organisation was to care for the health of the workers by subjecting them to compulsory health checks. However, it was also a tool that could be used to deny a job or to fire someone an under the guise of caring for that person’s health. A typical Communist trick.

A 1996 Ministry of Health ordinance included a vague clause that allowed any physician conducting the health check to ask for an arbitrary additional examination, an absolute carte blanche. This ordinance is still in force today. How is it possible that no one seems to notice its contradiction with the rights declared in the constitution?

The answer to this question is very simple. Constitution in Poland is a purely declarative document. It has no legal consequence. The very concept of law, such as it is understood in an average western democracy, does not exist.

A referral from one physician to another is nothing out of ordinary. The trick here is that the person controlled by the Occupational Health Service has no say in the matter. A refusal may lead to losing one’s job under the excuse of not having submitted a valid health certificate to the employer. Under the conditions of this ‘health check’ the person’s constitutional and legal rights are taken away. You become a prisoner.

Both Nazi and Communist concentration camps had their own health service as well. One could also call it an “occupational health service”. A negative opinion of someone’s health in Auschwitz, for example, meant the termination of employment and physical liquidation.

Contemporary liquidation administers a death of a social type. If you eliminate someone from public and professional life, it is as if this person had been liquidated physically as well. This is the current state of affairs in Poland and most likely in other Communist countries.

This is just one example.

So, as you look into details, it turns out things are completely opposite to what is declared publicly. This discrepancy persists regardless of who is currently in the PM’s office.

This means that the perception of what really happened or not happened in Eastern Europe is in a state of a cognitive catastrophe.

My wife and I are carrying out a project on critical narrative analysis, organised social violence, and criminal state. This was not our entirely free choice. We had to embark on it quite reluctantly.

Remember all those happy chirps about the ‘end of history’?

@LechSBorkowski

(This has been written by a former associate professor of Physics at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, currently a humble shop assistant in London, UK)

On WWII, memory management and control

I posted the following comment following the article Forgive us for starting the Second World War, Germany begs Poland in The Times:


The war was started by a joint German-Soviet invasion of Poland. Each of the invaders occupied roughly half of the country.

Joint Communist-Nazi victory parade was held in Brześć on the Bug river (Brest-Litovsk) on 22 September 1939. An interesting and highly symbolic photo can be viewed at https://lsborkowski.com/pol/joint-communist-nazi-victory-parade/. The Nazis and the Communists marched amicably in one triumphant column. Hammer and sickle in a brotherly embrace with the swastika.

Ideological differences notwithstanding, both Nazi and Soviet occupations implemented similar terror.

One remarkable early victim was Janusz Kusociński, winner of the 10k race in the Los Angeles Olympics in 1932. He got involved in efforts to organize resistance immediately after the German occupation began. He was arrested in March 1940 and shot in the forest near Warsaw on 21 June 1940.

After the war, Communists organised yearly athletic competition in Warsaw under Kusociński’s name: Memoriał Kusocińskiego. The first one was held in 1954. This was an exercise in the control and management of memory. Kusociński was killed by the Germans, not the Russians, which made his name eligible for such manipulation.

Around 2011 the Kusociński competition was expelled from Warsaw to Szczecin (Stettin). I am not sure if the competition was not inactive for a few years before that. A ridiculous move. Kusociński had no connection to Szczecin/Stettin, which was a German city before WWII. His name was, in a way, disposed of, to make space for a more recent name of someone else, thus confirming the post-1990 continuity of the Communist policy of memory management and control.

My wife’s grandfather, Aleksander Głuchowski, fought in the September 1939 campaign and facing defeat crossed the border to Lithuania to be interned there, rather than fall into the German or Russian hands. After Lithuania’s invasion by the Soviet Union, he was imprisoned in an Orthodox monastery near Kozelsk, the same place, from which thousands of Polish officers were transported to the execution site in the Katyn forest near Smolensk in the Spring of 1940. He was later transferred to Gryazovets in northern Russia.

Following the Nazis move eastward in June 1941, the Soviets were much more organised and disciplined in killing thousands of Polish citizens they earlier imprisoned [, than fighting the German army]. Some prisoners were forced to go on exhaustive marches East. Thousands either died of exhaustion or were killed in those marches.

The memory management and control policy eliminated those victims from memory and history.

The Wannsee conference of the senior Nazis was held in January 1942. The policy of the mass slaughter of Jews was decided upon and implemented.

Aleksander was eventually released by the Soviets and joined the Polish forces formed under the western Allies command.

He was not able to participate in the Allied victory parade in London in 1946. The British government preferred to appease the Communists and issued the invitation for the parade to the Communists in Warsaw. The Poles fighting on the western front were excluded.

When Aleksander returned to Poland in 1947, he was immediately arrested by the Communist secret police. When he was later released, he was exhausted and sick. He died in 1952 at the young age of 45. His wife died in 1945, shortly after the end of the war, probably of similar reasons: sickness and exhaustion. They last saw each other when Aleksander left to fight in September 1939.

In a database focused on victims of Communist terror (oficial word: “repression”, “terror” is inconvenient –> management and control of memory) his imprisonment in 1947 is omitted.

My own parents, Bolesław Borkowski and Irena Borkowska (Ostrowska), were also purged from the list of victims. When a “database of victims”, in which I was expected to find their names, was released few years ago, their names were not there. Memory management and control. My father deserted with the arms from the Communist army one day before the military oath was taken. This was on 13 January 1945. The entire company deserted. His group crossed the line which was imposed as the new eastern Polish border and was later surrounded and captured by NKVD after a battle, in which he was wounded. They were held in a citadel in the same Brześć, in which September 1939, the Nazi and Communist forces held joint victory parade. Conditions were horrible. The inmates were tortured.

My father avoided torture by putting his life on the line. When the NKVD man tried to get up from his desk, he knew what would come. He warned him to not even try because he himself was ready to die rather than yield to torture. He shouted at the Soviet: “You are worse than the Nazis!”. There was also an element of luck, of course. He was sentenced by the NKVD War Tribunal in June 1945 to ten years of hard labour camp. He was held in a camp in the Arkhangelsk area.

My mother was imprisoned by the Soviets in 1949 for her family helping Polish anti-Communist resistance. Her father and younger brother were arrested at the time as well. She was held in a hard labour camp from 1949 to 1956. When they found her brother’s whereabouts at the time when many camp prisoners were being released, he was completely damaged. He barely knew his name and he could not tell where he was held. This was the result of torture. You can see his picture online https://lsborkowski.com/pol/letter-malgorzata-gluchowska-lech-borkowski-prime-minister-poland-10-december-2017/

For my mother, the war which began in 1939, never ended.

Desertions from the Communist army were and still are taboo subjects. Memory management and control.

Keep in mind, that the Soviets killed thousands of Polish resistance members when they advanced westwards into the Polish territory in 1944-45. Being a member of the Communist army you would not fight for independent Poland. You would fight one enemy for the benefit of another one.

In the last months of the war, the British PM Winston Churchill signed an illegal agreement with the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin in Yalta, in which they decided to determine jointly the post-war borders of Poland. The border was to coincide roughly with the border of the Soviet occupation zone following the 1939 invasion.

The Yalta agreement was disastrous for dozens of millions of people. It was signed against the wishes of the people inhabiting the territories involved. Polish legal government, then in exile in London, was bypassed.

Churchill famously said at the end of WWI “When the war of the giants is over the wars of the pygmies will begin”. Clearly an imperial view of other nations.

Of course, the American and British leaders had no right to determine Polish post-WWII borders and the Yalta deal was illegal. Yalta is a symbol of western very deep cognitive disaster vis-a-vis Communism which continues today.

Both of my parents came from eastern Poland, which fell under the Soviet occupation during WWII and afterwards.

The official narrative about WWII in Poland is a firm proof of the continuation of the Communist policy. The Museum of WWII was located in Gdansk/Danzig instead of Warsaw to demonstrate that WWII was the war against Germany and to anchor the war firmly in the German context.

Lech Borkowski

Social terror in Poland

Another comment I wrote under the same article in the Telegraph as mentioned in my previous blog post.

“Lech Borkowski

After many years of bullying and all kinds of harassment of our family, my wife and I were expelled from our state jobs for political reasons in 2015. I worked as an associate professor of Physics at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan My wife Malgorzata Gluchowska is a pianist and she worked as a piano teacher in the State School of Music in Zielona Góra.

Whenever we objected to the violations of law or violations of our rights, we were threatened with the job loss either explicitly or implicitly.

Our family has been subjected to an extremely vicious campaign of bullying and harassment. Our daughter was attacked in her elementary school as well. You can read about it online at lsborkowski.com/pol/

My wife was eventually dismissed as psychologically unfit for her job despite being the best, the most successful piano teacher in the school.

These are mechanisms of social terror employed by the Communist regime. Nothing changed, except for superficial, meaningless symbolism. Crosses displayed in public places should be viewed more through the prism of the Red Army Choir’s triumphant visit to the Vatican in 2004, where they celebrated the 26th anniversary of pope John Paul’s pontificate. You can find this concert on youtube. The last song that evening was “Oka”, a hymn of the Polish Communist army organised in the Soviet Union in 1943.”