Communist capitalists

On 9 October 2019, The Times published the article Putin’s enemy Mikhail Khodorkovsky on Citizen K, the film that tells his story. Here are my comments posted on the newspaper’s website.

Comment 2 is a response to another reader’s post, who argued that

1. careers in politics or economy were reserved for the Communist party members.

2. “after the regime change the people who were best placed to become political and business leaders were the ones who had worked their way up under the old system.” This was argued to be entirely logical. Some dissidents have also made good careers but there enough of them to replace the incumbents.

3. The same thing happened in Germany after WWII, where only the top Nazis were purged.


Comment 1

Isn’t it funny that throughout entire Communist block the best way to achieve capitalist and/or political success is to be a Communist or come from Communist circles?

Khodorkovsky’s story is not credible.

Knowing how stories are fabricated in Poland, for example, where Communists where presented as liberals, enlightened democrats and pro-capitalist, I would remain highly skeptical of the article’s subject.

Comment 2

Paragraph 1. You suggest a surprisingly limited scope of control exercised by the Communist dictatorship. Only two areas of activity are mentioned, politics and economy. What about the judiciary, the military, lawlessness enforcement (not to be confused with the law enforcement in a normal country), education, science, etc.? Was there an area of activity remaining outside a strict control?

There was not.

Also religion was no exception.

Paragraph 2. “So of course after the regime change …”. What regime change? You mean the new guys, who are the same as the old guys? There was no regime change. Change was superficial and involved mostly the stage props. The control remained in the same hands.

The “leading dissidents” were performing the roles assigned to them by the Communists. In Poland the entire Solidarity movement of the 1970s and 1980s was created by the Communists themselves. The dissidents were fake.

The future “capitalist reformer”, “author of the big-bang transition to capitalism” was an earlier member of the Communist party and a former employee of the Institute of the Fundamental Problems of Marxism and Leninism in Warsaw.

I remember how some years ago the Polish Minister of Internal Affairs at the time and a former Communist Party member explained that those working in the Communist secret services where natural partners of western businesses, because of their knowledge and qualifications.

You write “it is entirely logical”. Whose logic do you follow?

The last sentence of Paragraph 2 contradicts the first one.

There was no regime change. The regime hasn’t changed not only at the top, but in the middle and in the lower layers of the hierarchy as well. In other words, the Communist system of the selection of the cadres remained firmly in place. These cadres remained fully operational in the same sense as before 1990. They are fully operational today. I happen to know this first-hand.

Paragraph 3. “The same thing happened in Germany after the war.” No, it has not. Germany after WWII and the Communist countries post-1990 are two different things.

@LechSBorkowski

Trust 2019

My comment to The Times article Anti-Putin protesters jailed for six years, 7 October 2019.

——

These protests seem to be mostly meaningless. Fake opposition is the most basic thing in Russia and other East European countries.

The same story is being repeated over and over again. Like a well known fairy tale children keep listening to, the West listens to, reads and watches tales of ‘protests’ and ‘opposition’. And Russia obligingly supplies these stories. But are there any true stories here?

One ought to remember what Operation Trust was in the 1920s Soviet Union and how it was replicated in countless variations over the years. The political and social situation in Eastern really is fundamentally different from the West. Think of China, a Communist country with a capitalist makeup. There are ways to camouflage the political life and stage it theatrically. After all, the whole Communist politics was a theatrical play.

So, has a magical return to authenticity in public life in Russia and other East European countries occured or not? It has not.

Take the example of Poland. The Communist regime in Poland created fake opposition movements in the 1970s and 1980s, complete with street protests and prison sentences, and staged a fake collapse in 1989. The first ‘non-communist’ prime minister, Tadeusz Mazowiecki for example, was a three-time deputy to the Communist parliament, each time elected with 96-99 percent of the ‘vote’. There is a long list of post-1990 leaders whom graduated from the same political school but pretended to represented change. The Communists were leading ‘transition to capitalism’ themselves. The Communist party headquarters were even converted to a stock exchange to symbolize the change.

Today’s ‘nationalist’ political leaders in Poland and Hungary are Communist-trained functionaries.

@LechSBorkowski

Michnik, Konrad, and the fake opposition to Communism

Comment to Gyorgy Konrad’s obituary in The Telegraph. The comment was submitted in the morning of 18 September 2019 among in the digital edition of the paper but was blocked.

——

Adam Michnik is a son of a Soviet agent convicted for his activities against the Polish state in the 1930s. His mother was a Communist as well. He led a highly privileged life. He was one of the key figures in the fake opposition movement created by the Communist authorities. The key roles in this “movement” were played by the children from the Communist hard core.

Communists understood very well that a full control of the past, the present, and the future requires a presence of a phony opposition as well. This trick allows to fool the observers as to the real workings of the system and enables easy maneuvering of the situation in a desirable direction. Also, it allows to execute long-term plans which are more difficult to detect and predict.

The first Communist large scale operation of this type was the Soviet Trust in the 1920s. The Soviets pretended that there is an active internal anti-Soviet opposition. Few years later, they called it off after fooling a large number of people as well as international observers.

Creating a fake opposition is a bread-and-butter Communist technique.

The entire Solidarity movement of the 1970s and 1980s was completely fake and fully controlled by the Communists.

This so-called opposition did not reveal any essential organisational details of the regime or its techniques. The Communist devil is in the details.

The official story line says that the Communist dictatorship collapsed like a house of cards. I am sorry to tell you that this is not true.

My wife and I were expelled from our jobs in state institution, school of music and university, respectively, for political reasons in 2015. We have been under harassment since we have been married more than 20 years ago.

My wife was forced to visit a psychologist under the threat of losing her job. The psychologist was supposedly testing her ability to continue her job of a pianist and piano teacher. There is of course no such thing in psychology as a way to determine during two 40-45 minutes conversations your ability to teach piano. My wife’s cv testifies to her excellent performance in her job. The psychologist issued a report which condemned her mental facilities. A typical Communist method.

The transcripts of the two conversations with the psychologist are available online on our website https://lsborkowski.com/pol/.

We wrote many critical texts about the situation in Poland and distributed it widely via fax, email, and letters. They are available at the aforementioned website. Some of them are also available at https://www.researchgate.net/project/Critical-Narrative-Analysis-Organized-Social-Violence-Criminal-State/ .

Here you can view our short video statement recorded in May 2016:

The Communist techniques are in continuous use in Poland. What we know and what we analyse and describe has not been published by any of the so-called “dissidents” from the Communist countries.

As to Mr. Konrad, I suppose he was a fake “opposition” figure.

@LechSBorkowski

Coercive control in Poland

The next comment under the same article as the last one in this blog.


Lech Borkowski 20 Aug 2019 11:04PM

I should add that if you would like to know more, you can get in touch me via Twitter at @LechSBorkowski.

If you want I can do a lecture or a seminar on the subject of coercive control in Poland. Free of charge.

Coercive control is a concept popularised in the area of domestic violence by Evan Stark (2007). In England, this concept has been used tin the criminal law in 2015.

The social violence implemented by the Communists is a variant of coercive control and is in continued use in Poland. Britain could remain in the same union with Poland only through ignorance.

In Poland the de facto system has norhing to do with the de jure declarations.

Polish Minds in Fetters

My comment following Niall Ferguson’s article “Science fiction has become dystopian fact” in The Times, 22 September 2019, about 8:30 pm local time.


My earlier comment was blocked. I will try again.

I would encourage everyone to read “Russian Minds in Fetters”, London: George Allen and Unwin, by the Polish writer and statesman Stanisław Mackiewicz. There is also a more recent edition by Routledge, 2018. He applied to visit the Soviet Union through official channels and having finally received permission, traveled there in 1929. The book is an account of his experience during the trip. The book withstood the test of time remarkably well, as I had to acknowledge few years ago following my own and my family’s experience with the next stage of totalitarianism in Poland. I warmly recommend it.

While Orwell’s 1984 is a very valuable work of fiction, it is just that: a work of fiction. It should not be taken as a substitute for a real-life experience.

Huxley’s idea that the totalitarianism of the future is likely to be of the “love your servitude” type is generally correct, as is evident in Eastern Europe. Rumours about a democratic transition in countries such as Poland, for example, are vastly exaggerated.

There is an abundance of evidence contradicting the official dogma of the “democratic transition” in Eastern Europe. Let me give you just one example.

My wife was fired from her job of a pianist and piano teacher in the State School of Music in Zielona Góra in Poland in Autumn 2015, using a document fabricated by the Occupational Health Service. The document stated that my wife cannot continue performing her job for unspecified health reasons. The key was a psychologist’s opinion, who accused my wife of having unspecified “delusions”.

We have submitted detailed evidence to the Prime Minister of Poland and to the Minister of Justice, who is also the Prosecutor General. Other Ministers, the Minister of Health, and MPs were informed as well.

Everyone knows that there is no such thing as a scientifically valid procedure of assessment of someone’s psychological ability to do the job of a pianist and piano teacher (and almost any other job, save for the very few narrow tests). Everyone who received our correspondence is perfectly aware that a crime has been committed by the named health service ‘specialists’. We have sound recordings of my wife two conversations with the psychologist. We submitted this evidence to the country’s top authorities.

Nothing happened. Silence, save for the falsifications carried out by the local prosecutor office.

We have informed members of the European Parliament as well. Hundreds of them. No result.

The idea of Occupational Health Service was created under the Communist dictatorship. The officially declared aim of this organisation was to care for the health of the workers by subjecting them to compulsory health checks. However, it was also a tool that could be used to deny a job or to fire someone an under the guise of caring for that person’s health. A typical Communist trick.

A 1996 Ministry of Health ordinance included a vague clause that allowed any physician conducting the health check to ask for an arbitrary additional examination, an absolute carte blanche. This ordinance is still in force today. How is it possible that no one seems to notice its contradiction with the rights declared in the constitution?

The answer to this question is very simple. Constitution in Poland is a purely declarative document. It has no legal consequence. The very concept of law, such as it is understood in an average western democracy, does not exist.

A referral from one physician to another is nothing out of ordinary. The trick here is that the person controlled by the Occupational Health Service has no say in the matter. A refusal may lead to losing one’s job under the excuse of not having submitted a valid health certificate to the employer. Under the conditions of this ‘health check’ the person’s constitutional and legal rights are taken away. You become a prisoner.

Both Nazi and Communist concentration camps had their own health service as well. One could also call it an “occupational health service”. A negative opinion of someone’s health in Auschwitz, for example, meant the termination of employment and physical liquidation.

Contemporary liquidation administers a death of a social type. If you eliminate someone from public and professional life, it is as if this person had been liquidated physically as well. This is the current state of affairs in Poland and most likely in other Communist countries.

This is just one example.

So, as you look into details, it turns out things are completely opposite to what is declared publicly. This discrepancy persists regardless of who is currently in the PM’s office.

This means that the perception of what really happened or not happened in Eastern Europe is in a state of a cognitive catastrophe.

My wife and I are carrying out a project on critical narrative analysis, organised social violence, and criminal state. This was not our entirely free choice. We had to embark on it quite reluctantly.

Remember all those happy chirps about the ‘end of history’?

@LechSBorkowski

(This has been written by a former associate professor of Physics at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, currently a humble shop assistant in London, UK)

Poland, EU, Brexit

On 19 August 2019 The Telegraph (London) published an article by Madeline Grant My trip to Poland left me more convinced than ever that we are right to leave the EU to fulfil its superstate ambitions.

The author wrote about her experience during the literary festival in Sopot in Poland.

I participated in the discussion following the article, making a series of comments. Here is the first of them.

“Lech Borkowski 20 Aug 2019 12:01PM

First, I think one should get a grip on the basics. Much has been written about the so-called “velvet” revolution in Eastern Europe, the mythical rise of “the people”. In truth the reorganisation of the 1980s and 1990s was simply a remodelling of the old prison. The camp is now beautified with money pouring in from the EU.

The outside observers have been confused by the cacophony, the noise, and the supposed magic rebirth of pre-WWII parties, political views, and dangerous organisations. Religious sceptics, the non-believers, believed in a miracle: the most sinister, the most perfidious and the most advanced dictatorship ever known simply collapsed under its own weight.

The first allegedly non-communist prime minister of Poland in 1989, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, was a three-time member of the Communist parliament. Each time he was “elected” with about 97 to 99 percent of the vote. While he was formally not a Communist party member, there is no higher Comunist distinction than 99 percent of the vote.

Another “hero” of the “opposition” was Adam Michnik, son of a convicted spy of the Soviet Russia in the 1930s.

The current supposedly nationalist and populist leader of the ruling party, Jaroslaw Kaczynski, is a son of a Communist party member. His mother had a highly privileged job in the Institute of Literary Studies in Warsaw.

Former allegedly center-right president (2010-2015) Bronisław Komorowski comes from a family most faithfully and obediently serving the Communist regime. His parents worked in one editorial office with the top ideologues of the Communist party in the 1960s.

The “architect” of the big-bang transition to capitalism was Leszek Balcerowicz, a former Communist party member and an employee of the Institute for Basic Problems of Marxism-Leninism in Warsaw.

Lecturers in Oxford and Cambridge continue to peddle the drugs of the velvet revolution and the “transition to democracy”.

E. European countries are now part of the EU.

Do you believe in miracles?

@LechSBorkowski