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Awkwardly euphemistic

Comment on the article Vladimir Putin bans comparisons between Soviets and Nazi Germany in Second World War by Tom Parfitt in The Times, 1 July 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 12 July 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times 12 July 2021

‘The latter is likely to anger former Soviet states like Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, which say they were occupied by the Red Army and then coerced into joining the Soviet Union against their will.’

The Times follows the Communist narrative, which avoids any mention of occupation of Poland by Soviet Russia. The phrase ‘coerced into joining … against their will’ is awkwardly euphemistic. We are talking here about murder, torture, concentration camps. The use of ‘former Soviet states’ is inappropriate. They didn’t have any sovereignty.

Note also the following:

‘In response, Mateusz Morawiecki, Poland’s prime minister, called Putin a liar.’

This is a non-essential criticism from Polish PM. By calling Putin a liar Morawiecki avoided giving proper response, which would be to recall the Communist terror unleashed against Polish citizens, such as my family members, in eastern Poland occupied by Soviet Russia. Contemporary Polish ruling class follows unmistakably the same Communist narrative, in which eastern Poland and its citizens are to be erased.

@LechSBorkowski

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Century of cognitive neglect

Comment on the editorial article Belarusians look to the West in vain for support in The Telegraph, 24 May 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Telegraph 25 May 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Telegraph 25 May 2021

The Belarussian ‘opposition’ tv channel Nexta uses the Telegram app provided by a group of Russians from Sankt Petersburg/Leningrad. Telegram is advertised as a safer, encrypted method of communication. They operate their company from Dubai now. Russia is gradually expanding their control of the Internet. Those signing up to use Telegram voluntarily submit their personal details and their communications to the Russian state.

@Nexta_tv’s last post on Twitter was in January 2021. Nexta’s Twitter accounts direct users to their Telegram accounts instead. You need to sign up to Telegram to view Nexta. This kind of members-only strictly controlled environment is typical of the Communist modus operandi, in which control of content and access to it is key. In other words, it is a strict surveillance.

Nexta’s founder, Stsiapan Putsila is a member of the Belarussian privileged class and is a son of a tv sports presenter. I couldn’t find Putsila’s Twitter account. He probably doesn’t have one.

The material posted by Belarus ‘opposition’ on freely available media is mostly of theatrical nature. I don’t see any substance in it. I am coming from a family of prisoners of Communist concentration camps and I know a few things about state terror and how to distinguish authentic repression from a fake one.

Western media and analysts go hysterical about a bit of shouting and pushing. This is a result of a century of cognitive neglect. Bits of reality which do not fit their preferred mode of thinking are thrown out the window.

Yesterday, I posted a similar comment under The Times article but it was later removed by the paper. You can read it here:

The Internet and the Russian state

@LechSBorkowski

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The Internet and the Russian state

Comment on the article Anger after Ryanair flight ‘hijacked’ by Lukashenko to arrest dissident by Marc Bennetts, The Times, May 24 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Times 24 May 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times 24 May 2021

The Nexta channel is run on Telegram, service operated by a Russian team from Dubai, as the company’s website explains:

“The Telegram development team is based in Dubai. Most of the developers behind Telegram originally come from St. Petersburg”, i.e. Leningrad.

Pavel Durov, Telegram’s chief, has an account on Twitter but remains mostly silent since January 2021. Similarly, Nexta stopped posting on Twitter in January 2021.

This story has Russian and Belarussian state written all over it. The so-called ‘opposition’ is fake. Gullible westerners will believe anything and will not ask any questions.

Nexta’s founder Stsiapan Putsila was born into Belarussian privileged class, Financial Times February 25 2021:

“[Putsila’s] father had been a sports presenter since the 1990s who was the only one who broadcast in the Belarusian language”

Putsila doesn’t seem to have a Twitter account.

Looking at the material posted by the Belarussian ‘opposition’ I haven’t noticed anything significant. Plenty of theatricals but no substance.

The Russian state is gradually wresting control over large portions of the Internet from western companies and governments. If you believe that Telegram has nothing to do with the Russian state, you are a complete fool. Those signing up for Telegram should be aware that they are giving their personal data and the contents of their communication to the Russian state.

@LechSBorkowski

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Monuments to Dzerzhinsky in Russia

Comment on the article Lenin’s architect of red terror rises again by Ben Macintyre in The Times, 16 September 2017.


I used Google Maps recently to try and locate monuments to Felix Dzerzhinsky in Russia. There is lots of them all over the country. Here is a sample. The tweets quoted below are part of a thread, where I provide coordinates and pictures, courtesy of Google, of this organizer of the Communist secret police.

Public space in Russia is as Soviet and Communist as ever. Most of the articles from Russia ignore this most basic information.

Moscow (two statues), Sankt Petersburg, Saratov, Ufa, Volgograd (two), Taganrog, Kirov, Krasnoyarsk, Novosibirsk, Dzerzhinsk, Oryol, Kursk…

Kirov has a shopping centre named after him. Numerous streets, squares.

Then there is the monument to Stalin unveiled in Yakutsk in 2013.

Absolutely horrible.

@LechSBorkowski

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Fake victim, fake opposition in Russia

Comment on the article Navalny details regime of punishment and torture in prison by Maria Georgieva in The Times, 29 March 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 30 March 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times 30 March 2021

This is a ridiculous comedy. Russian state apparatus can do what they want. If the messages travel outside, then this is exactly what the Russian authorities want. Navalny is not a victim of that state. He is one of them.

My parents and other family members were prisoners of Communist concentration camps in Russia. This is the same Russia, but Navalny is a fake victim. The trick is to talk about fake victims instead of real ones.

Fake opposition is already a hundred-year old concept in Russia.

@LechSBorkowski

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EU Parliament ignores victims of Communist methods

Comment on the editorial The Times view on Russia sanctions: Punishing Putin, 23 February 2021. Polish version: Parlament Europejski ignoruje ofiary metod komunistycznych.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 23 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski comment in The Times 23 February 2021

Polish authorities used the service of occupational medicine service against my wife in 2015. They manufactured fake medical statement to expel her from the job of pianist and piano teacher at the State School of Music in Zielona Góra. This was done with the approval of the government. We have detailed evidence, including sound recordings, which are now available on Youtube. My wife was accused by a psychologist of having unspecified delusions. She was forced to visit a psychologist twice as part of a routine occupational medicine checkup under threat of losing her job.

Earlier, we wrote many letters to state officials pointing out violations of law and human rights during an intense campaign against our family which went on for years. We have notified the members of the European Parliament several times. They ignored us. We have also contacted human rights organisations who have remained silent.

Europe likes declarations about human rights but hates to engage with the victims and actually do anything.

My family members, including my parents, all Polish citizens, were prisoners of Communist concentration camps in northern Russia after WWII. There is space at the European Parliament for members of Communist totalitarian organisations but there is no space for victims of Communist methods in a European Union country.

@LechSBorkowski

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Rees, Navalny, Colston, Dzerzhinsky

Comment on the article Marvin Rees: ‘When my pal Alexei Navalny is free, I’ll give him a grand tour of Bristol’ by Matthew Campbell in The Sunday Times, 14 February 2021. Polish version: Rees, Navalny, Colston, Dzierżyński,


Lech S Borkowski comment The Sunday Times 14 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski comment in The Sunday Times 14 February 2021

In the June 8, 2020 article in the Evening Standard Marvin J Rees was quoted to have said

“My concern though is that racism is tackled not just by pulling down statues in symbolic moments – it’s stitched into the system. It’s the systematic exclusion of people from opportunity and power.”

This was after the statue of Colston the slave trader was toppled in Bristol.

This systematic exclusion of people from opportunity and power is a fact in Eastern Europe. The statues of Dzerzhinsky are standing in Russian cities, some erected recently. Contemporary Russia is built on terror and genocide. Navalny has no problem with that. Corruption is a nonessential issue in Russia. It is an ersatz story.

Mr Rees, you can meet me. I have a PhD in Physics from an American university and I will tell you how the systematic exclusion from opportunity and power is carried out in Eastern Europe. I will also tell you how my pianist wife and I were expelled from our jobs in Polish state educational institutions for our beliefs and simply for who we are.

@LechSBorkowski

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Media footprint

Comment on the article Kremlin plans new law to block Alexei Navalny’s wife from running in Russia’s election in September by Marc Bennetts in The Times, 10 February 2021. Polish version: Ślad medialny.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 10 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski comment in The Times 10 February 2021

The story is laughable. The Russian regime does not need any laws to act and get things done. The talk about a special law to prevent someone from running for office means that person is part of the regime. If the regime considers you a threat in any way, they eliminate you with the smallest legal and media footprint possible, preferably none. The whole Navalny affair is a comedy played mainly for external consumption. The polit-soap opera fills journalistic quotas nicely without providing anything useful.

Production of fake opposition is a very old concept in Eastern Europe but for some reason the media fail to report it.

The modus operandi of the state is different and I would not expect to read about it on the pages of The Times.

@LechSBorkowski

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Dzerzhinsky Avenue

Comment on the article Alexei Navalny jailed for three years as police crack down on fresh protests in Moscow by Natalia Vasilyeva in The Telegraph, 3 February 2021. Polish version: Aleja Dzierżyńskiego.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Telegraph 3 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Telegraph 3 February 2021

Navalny is one of many Russia’s state-run projects. He is clearly a member of the Russian privileged class. This spectacle is a creation of political technologists. Engaging in it is a waste time. They don’t teach Communist techniques of provocation and narrative control at UK universities, do they?

I have not seen any mention of the Communist genocide in this context. Corruption is a problem but genocide isn’t? I haven’t noticed anyone protesting against town names such as Dzerzhinsk or street names such Dzerzhinsky Street or Dzerzhinsky Prospekt.

Corruption is a nonessential criticism in Russia. It is a useful diversion.

What about those millions murdered, expelled and terrorised? Communist genocidal policies are continued in Eastern Europe, including EU and NATO members.

I have an obligation to point this out as a son of Polish survivors of Communist concentration camps in northern Russia.

@LechSBorkowski

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You have been told the wrong story

Comment on the editorial article A reckoning is coming for Vladimir Putin in The Telegraph, 1 February 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Telegraph 1 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Telegraph 1 February 2021

It isn’t about the man in the Kremlin either. Russians and other East Europeans successfully trained West Europeans to follow the fake narrative. It is as if Communism has never existed and from extremes of collectivism Russia, Belarus, Poland moved into extremes of a one man rule (Kaczynski in Poland ruling allegedly from the back seat). This is nonsense of course.

These protests are staged. You just don’t understand. You have been told the wrong story.

@LechSBorkowski

https://lsborkowski.com/pol/

This comment was removed by the newspaper staff. Later that day I posted another comment including the removed text.

Lech S Borkowski second comment in The Telegraph 1 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski, second comment in The Telegraph 1 February 2021

Around 3:30 pm I posted a comment which was removed. I am not sure on what grounds? I am posting it again minus a web link.

I find it quite symbolic that opinion expressed by a son of survivors of Soviet Communist concentration camps is eliminated. My short text above is not a casual remark. It is based on experience and long-term analysis of public narratives in Eastern Europe. I doubt there is anyone with similar family connections among The Telegraph staff and experience similar to mine.

Uniformity of opinion and interpretation is not necessarily a sign of correctness.

Promoting corruption as the main issue in Russia has obvious benefits to the ruling class and Russia in general. It is a safe subject and a universal problem encountered in varying proportions around the world. Communist political technologists understood long time ago that it is far better to engineer an issue rather than wait until one appears spontaneously and grows out of control. Anti-corruption campaign is a nonessential criticism. Russia’s power structures and loyalties are built on Communist foundations and terror. The issue of corruption, whether real or imagined, is a useful diversion. Had Navalny been an independent person, he would be eliminated very early on and you would never have heard about him. The personnel and appropriate techniques can be deployed at any time, without resorting to poison. Instead, the cycles of arrest-release-rearrest are carried out by the Russian state mainly to stimulate interest in the spectacle.

@LechSBorkowski

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