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Fake victim, fake opposition in Russia

Comment on the article Navalny details regime of punishment and torture in prison by Maria Georgieva in The Times, 29 March 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 30 March 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times 30 March 2021

This is a ridiculous comedy. Russian state apparatus can do what they want. If the messages travel outside, then this is exactly what the Russian authorities want. Navalny is not a victim of that state. He is one of them.

My parents and other family members were prisoners of Communist concentration camps in Russia. This is the same Russia, but Navalny is a fake victim. The trick is to talk about fake victims instead of real ones.

Fake opposition is already a hundred-year old concept in Russia.

@LechSBorkowski

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EU Parliament ignores victims of Communist methods

Comment on the editorial The Times view on Russia sanctions: Punishing Putin, 23 February 2021.


Lech S Borlowski comment The Times 23 February 2021
Lech S Borlowski comment in The Times 23 February 2021

Polish authorities used the service of occupational medicine service against my wife in 2015. They manufactured fake medical statement to expel her from the job of pianist and piano teacher at the State School of Music in Zielona Góra. This was done with the approval of the government. We have detailed evidence, including sound recordings, which are now available on Youtube. My wife was accused by a psychologist of having unspecified delusions. She was forced to visit a psychologist twice as part of a routine occupational medicine checkup under threat of losing her job.

Earlier, we wrote many letters to state officials pointing out violations of law and human rights during an intense campaign against our family which went on for years. We have notified the members of the European Parliament several times. They ignored us. We have also contacted human rights organisations who have remained silent.

Europe likes declarations about human rights but hates to engage with the victims and actually do anything.

My family members, including my parents, all Polish citizens, were prisoners of Communist concentration camps in northern Russia after WWII. There is space at the European Parliament for members of Communist totalitarian organisations but there is no space for victims of Communist methods in a European Union country.

@LechSBorkowski

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Rees, Navalny, Colston, Dzerzhinsky

Comment on the article Marvin Rees: ‘When my pal Alexei Navalny is free, I’ll give him a grand tour of Bristol’ by Matthew Campbell in The Sunday Times, 14 February 2021. Polish version: Rees, Navalny, Colston, Dzierżyński,


Lech S Borkowski comment The Sunday Times 14 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski comment in The Sunday Times 14 February 2021

In the June 8, 2020 article in the Evening Standard Marvin J Rees was quoted to have said

“My concern though is that racism is tackled not just by pulling down statues in symbolic moments – it’s stitched into the system. It’s the systematic exclusion of people from opportunity and power.”

This was after the statue of Colston the slave trader was toppled in Bristol.

This systematic exclusion of people from opportunity and power is a fact in Eastern Europe. The statues of Dzerzhinsky are standing in Russian cities, some erected recently. Contemporary Russia is built on terror and genocide. Navalny has no problem with that. Corruption is a nonessential issue in Russia. It is an ersatz story.

Mr Rees, you can meet me. I have a PhD in Physics from an American university and I will tell you how the systematic exclusion from opportunity and power is carried out in Eastern Europe. I will also tell you how my pianist wife and I were expelled from our jobs in Polish state educational institutions for our beliefs and simply for who we are.

@LechSBorkowski

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Media footprint

Comment on the article Kremlin plans new law to block Alexei Navalny’s wife from running in Russia’s election in September by Marc Bennetts in The Times, 10 February 2021. Polish version: Ślad medialny.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 10 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski comment in The Times 10 February 2021

The story is laughable. The Russian regime does not need any laws to act and get things done. The talk about a special law to prevent someone from running for office means that person is part of the regime. If the regime considers you a threat in any way, they eliminate you with the smallest legal and media footprint possible, preferably none. The whole Navalny affair is a comedy played mainly for external consumption. The polit-soap opera fills journalistic quotas nicely without providing anything useful.

Production of fake opposition is a very old concept in Eastern Europe but for some reason the media fail to report it.

The modus operandi of the state is different and I would not expect to read about it on the pages of The Times.

@LechSBorkowski

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Dzerzhinsky Avenue

Comment on the article Alexei Navalny jailed for three years as police crack down on fresh protests in Moscow by Natalia Vasilyeva in The Telegraph, 3 February 2021. Polish version: Aleja Dzierżyńskiego.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Telegraph 3 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Telegraph 3 February 2021

Navalny is one of many Russia’s state-run projects. He is clearly a member of the Russian privileged class. This spectacle is a creation of political technologists. Engaging in it is a waste time. They don’t teach Communist techniques of provocation and narrative control at UK universities, do they?

I have not seen any mention of the Communist genocide in this context. Corruption is a problem but genocide isn’t? I haven’t noticed anyone protesting against town names such as Dzerzhinsk or street names such Dzerzhinsky Street or Dzerzhinsky Prospekt.

Corruption is a nonessential criticism in Russia. It is a useful diversion.

What about those millions murdered, expelled and terrorised? Communist genocidal policies are continued in Eastern Europe, including EU and NATO members.

I have an obligation to point this out as a son of Polish survivors of Communist concentration camps in northern Russia.

@LechSBorkowski

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You have been told the wrong story

Comment on the editorial article A reckoning is coming for Vladimir Putin in The Telegraph, 1 February 2021.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Telegraph 1 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Telegraph 1 February 2021

It isn’t about the man in the Kremlin either. Russians and other East Europeans successfully trained West Europeans to follow the fake narrative. It is as if Communism has never existed and from extremes of collectivism Russia, Belarus, Poland moved into extremes of a one man rule (Kaczynski in Poland ruling allegedly from the back seat). This is nonsense of course.

These protests are staged. You just don’t understand. You have been told the wrong story.

@LechSBorkowski

https://lsborkowski.com/pol/

This comment was removed by the newspaper staff. Later that day I posted another comment including the removed text.

Lech S Borkowski second comment in The Telegraph 1 February 2021
Lech S Borkowski, second comment in The Telegraph 1 February 2021

Around 3:30 pm I posted a comment which was removed. I am not sure on what grounds? I am posting it again minus a web link.

I find it quite symbolic that opinion expressed by a son of survivors of Soviet Communist concentration camps is eliminated. My short text above is not a casual remark. It is based on experience and long-term analysis of public narratives in Eastern Europe. I doubt there is anyone with similar family connections among The Telegraph staff and experience similar to mine.

Uniformity of opinion and interpretation is not necessarily a sign of correctness.

Promoting corruption as the main issue in Russia has obvious benefits to the ruling class and Russia in general. It is a safe subject and a universal problem encountered in varying proportions around the world. Communist political technologists understood long time ago that it is far better to engineer an issue rather than wait until one appears spontaneously and grows out of control. Anti-corruption campaign is a nonessential criticism. Russia’s power structures and loyalties are built on Communist foundations and terror. The issue of corruption, whether real or imagined, is a useful diversion. Had Navalny been an independent person, he would be eliminated very early on and you would never have heard about him. The personnel and appropriate techniques can be deployed at any time, without resorting to poison. Instead, the cycles of arrest-release-rearrest are carried out by the Russian state mainly to stimulate interest in the spectacle.

@LechSBorkowski

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The uber-hyped narrative

Comment to the op-ed article Navalny’s brave battle should be ours too in The Sunday Times, 24 January 2021. Polish version: Hiper-rozdmuchana narracja.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Sunday Times 24 January 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Sunday Times 24 January 2021

The Times’ articles devoted to protests are not particularly informative. There is really no information beyond a handful of keywords sprinkled throughout the text. One might think that there is new religion in town, Protestology. Protestology is journalists’ junk food. It is extremely superficial. The activists come out to the streets, they protest, and bang! you have got news. Or have you, really? A protest in the UK or US is not the same as a ‘protest’ in Russia or elsewhere in Eastern Europe.

If there is such readiness to protest in Russia or elsewhere in the Communist block, why disciples of the Church of Protestology do not embrace combatting the Communist, totalitarian legacy?

The ruling class in Russia post-1990, like pretty much everywhere else in the Communist block, remained the same as pre-1990. Protests belong to the abc of political technology. The ‘protesters’ are members of the same ruling class. Fake conflicts are bread-and-butter of public life under Communism 2.0.

I have watched media reporting hundreds of protests in another Communist country, in Poland. However, I have never seen in daily life any trace of the allegedly ‘febrile’ atmosphere leading to protests. This applies both to the days before 1990 and after that date.

The uber-hyped protests are an ideal tool to shape the narrative. Given the disciplined Communist social troops, they can organise protest about anything and thus impose practically any arbitrarily chosen public narrative. The method is tried and tested.

Note complete absence from The Times of stories related to Communist genocide.

@LechSBorkowski

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Fake dissidents

Comment on the article Now is the moment for Berlin to show Russia some backbone by Mark Galeotti in The Telegraph, 18 January 2021. Polish version: Fałszywi dysydenci, czyli rosyjski projekt państwowy.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Telegraph 18 January 2021
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Telegraph 18 January 2021

Lech Borkowski   20 Jan 2021 8:30AM

Navalny is Russia’s state-run project. Anti-corruption campaigns belong to the category of non-essential criticism. They do not reveal anything substantial. This is Russia’s way of saying ‘we are just like you, comrades, we just have more of it’.

Russia produces fake dissidents. This is their way to control the narrative. Western correspondents get ready-to-print stories, endless polit-soap operas leading nowhere.

Similar methods are used elsewhere in the Eastern block, including current EU and NATO members.

@LechSBorkowski

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Decades of false reporting

My comment on the article Putin has become tangled in his own web by Roger Boyes in The Times, 20 October 2020. Polish version: Dziesięciolecia błędnych artykułów.


Lech S Borkowski comment in The Times 21 October 2020
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times 21 October 2020

“He finds Lukashenko embarrassing and ducked out of at least one meeting with him in Moscow, yet under pressure from Minsk he has put the Belarus opposition leader Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, exiled in Lithuania, on the Russian wanted list. If he wants quiet on Russia’s western front, he has decided, Lukashenko has to be propped up.”

The Times record, including Mr Boyes, on reporting and interpreting Eastern Europe is not particularly great. We are now in 2020, after decades of false reporting.

This reasoning is based on assumptions that might apply to a western democracy, but not to Communist states. It ignores what happened there during the last hundred years. It postulates implicitly certain type of stupidity and lack of cunning among the Russian rulers.

If anything, they outsmarted consistently the West.

For example, the changes of 1989-90 in Poland and elsewhere in Eastern Europe were not related to the overthrow of Communism. This was merely a reorganisation, a change of scenography. It was the Communists themselves who organised ‘the opposition’ recruiting from their own ranks, with Adam Michnik and Tadeusz Mazowiecki their prime examples in Poland. Mr Boyes apparently either failed to notice the obvious or decided to cleanse his narrative of contradicting elements

It is no different in Belarus this time.

@LechSBorkowski

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Incorrect assumptions

My comment on Tony Brenton’s article Another martyr for democracy is the last thing Vladimir Putin needs in The Telegraph, 20 August 2020.


Lech Borkowski
21 Aug 2020 2:35PM

Western analyses of events and situation in Russia and elsewhere in the Eastern Bloc are formed on incorrect assumptions. While they are formally correct within the western logic, the regimes of the Eastern Bloc went far beyond the confines of that logic.

The so-called ‘velvet revolution’ of 1989-90 is viewed mistakenly as the collapse of Communism. This is an incorrect interpretation. The velvet transition to a simulated democracy was sign of dictatorship’s strength, not weakness. The strong, thorough control of the state enabled the transition to the next stage. The so-called ‘democratic opposition’ to Communism was the creation of Communist political technologists. The activists were recruited from among the most loyal members of the dictatorship.

The transition process was spread over many years, hence even greater confusion among western observers. Patient, detailed observation of the daily reality of the Eastern Bloc states reveals that those states continue to follow the Communist pattern, although they avoid using the Communist rhetoric and symbols. Arranging fake conflicts, political and otherwise is no problem. Corruption scandals? No problem.

If you want to catch a fly, you have two main options: (1) a sudden catching move, which is faster than fly’s reflexes, (2) a slow, patient series of incremental moves, which remain below the fly’s cognitive threshold. The first stage of Communism’s confrontation with the West, which ended in 1990, made the western fly too nervous. The same western fly post-1990 is much more agreeable and cooperating, and accepts the series of incremental moves slowly leading to its demise.

Opposition figures such as Navalny are projects of political technology run by the state. If necessary, they can be terminated by staging the activist’s death. This is no problem. We are talking about the state which runs on falsification for more than one hundred years already. The theatrical actions of the state against Navalny, which reinforce his public visibility and credibility in the West, serve the fake narrative. Putin and Navalny are players in the same team.

It is a bit like watching a fixed sport’s match. Those unaware cannot comprehend they may be watching a fake competition.

Western thinking is firmly frozen within the Orwellian framework, but there is more than one way to run a dictatorship. Western societies have not lived under a Communist dictatorship and they mostly refuse to comprehend the enormity of lies and the extraordinary capacity of the totalitarian state to generate fake narratives. No one expresses a surprise about a seemingly endless supply of dissidents in a state which can easily liquidate everyone.

Demonstrations and strikes can be easily arranged as well. If you look at Belarus these days, the so-called ‘opposition’ has no program. Their members come from privileged sectors of the Communist dictatorship and their interests are identical to those of Lukashenko.

The totalitarian state has the entire state apparatus at its disposal. The preferable method of liquidating someone who is truly inconvenient is a series of provocations masqueraded as entirely accidental events without external witnesses and without alerting the western media. An inconvenient person is liquidated before it becomes known to western audience.

My wife and I have a lot of personal experience with the subject matter.

@LechSBorkowski

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