Donald Tusk and the Communist opposition to Communism

My comment on Asa Bennett’s article in The Telegraph Donald Tusk thinks Brexiteers are longing for empire. Has he met the EU elite?


Lech Borkowski 14 Nov 2019 1:46PM

It is useful to know where Tusk and the like come from. The Communists in Poland have trained a number of people for future positions of leadership. The idea was to organize fake opposition to Communism and to pretend that the Communism in Eastern Europe collapsed. They created fake political groups. Tusk was positioned as a young free-market liberal.

The creation of fake opposition is an old Communist trick. In the 1920s Soviet Russia their secret service ran the Operation Trust, whose aim was to fool the outsiders and the Russian emigres that there was a real internal opposition to the Soviet terror. It is an old idea really.

The Communist-style politics runs in a provocateur mode. Pretty much everything is a provocation, while the effort is made to pretend it is a real thing.

So, Tusk is a Communist provocateur simply doing what he is told to do. This is a labour of the many, not the few.

@LechSBorkowski

[In reaction to this, certain Adam Johnson supposed that I must be a Law and Justice supporter and used a derogatory word to describe my comment. Here is my response.]

Lech Borkowski 14 Nov 2019 5:59PM

Sorry to disappoint you. I don’t support any political party in Poland. I was expelled from my job for political reasons in Autumn 2015. My wife was expelled from her job as well for political reasons. It is all here: lsborkowski.com/pol/

The leader of Law and Justice party in Poland, Jarosław Kaczynski is a son of a Communist party member. He comes from a family firmly embedded in Communism and thus privileged. My comment about Tusk applies to Kaczynski as well, with the exception of Kaczynski was positioned to the right of Tusk on the political axis.

I was a member of the Law and Justice from 2008 to 2010. I saw in essence no difference between it and the Communist party.

@LechSBorkowski

Poland, EU, Brexit

On 19 August 2019 The Telegraph (London) published an article by Madeline Grant My trip to Poland left me more convinced than ever that we are right to leave the EU to fulfil its superstate ambitions.

The author wrote about her experience during the literary festival in Sopot in Poland.

I participated in the discussion following the article, making a series of comments. Here is the first of them.

“Lech Borkowski 20 Aug 2019 12:01PM

First, I think one should get a grip on the basics. Much has been written about the so-called “velvet” revolution in Eastern Europe, the mythical rise of “the people”. In truth the reorganisation of the 1980s and 1990s was simply a remodelling of the old prison. The camp is now beautified with money pouring in from the EU.

The outside observers have been confused by the cacophony, the noise, and the supposed magic rebirth of pre-WWII parties, political views, and dangerous organisations. Religious sceptics, the non-believers, believed in a miracle: the most sinister, the most perfidious and the most advanced dictatorship ever known simply collapsed under its own weight.

The first allegedly non-communist prime minister of Poland in 1989, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, was a three-time member of the Communist parliament. Each time he was “elected” with about 97 to 99 percent of the vote. While he was formally not a Communist party member, there is no higher Comunist distinction than 99 percent of the vote.

Another “hero” of the “opposition” was Adam Michnik, son of a convicted spy of the Soviet Russia in the 1930s.

The current supposedly nationalist and populist leader of the ruling party, Jaroslaw Kaczynski, is a son of a Communist party member. His mother had a highly privileged job in the Institute of Literary Studies in Warsaw.

Former allegedly center-right president (2010-2015) Bronisław Komorowski comes from a family most faithfully and obediently serving the Communist regime. His parents worked in one editorial office with the top ideologues of the Communist party in the 1960s.

The “architect” of the big-bang transition to capitalism was Leszek Balcerowicz, a former Communist party member and an employee of the Institute for Basic Problems of Marxism-Leninism in Warsaw.

Lecturers in Oxford and Cambridge continue to peddle the drugs of the velvet revolution and the “transition to democracy”.

E. European countries are now part of the EU.

Do you believe in miracles?

@LechSBorkowski