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Polishing images of totalitarian agents in The Telegraph

The untold story of Edith Tudor-Hart: ‘grandmother’ of the Cambridge spies by Charlotte Philby in The Telegraph, 3 October 2020. Wersja polska: Ocieplanie wizerunku agentów totalitaryzmu.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Telegraph 4 October 2020
Lech Borkowski, comment in The Telegraph 4 October 2020

When thinking about woman’s bravery, I prefer my mother, who was imprisoned by the Communist henchmen in eastern Poland occupied by the Soviet Russia after WWII. She was ‘tried’ by a local Soviet military tribunal in 1949, together with her father and a younger brother. She tried to protect both of them in her responses during interrogations. She was subsequently imprisoned in a concentration camp in northern Russia in the Arkhangelsk area. She was released in 1956. The war, which was started by joint invasion of Nazi and Communist forces on Poland, has never ended for her. Communist thugs harassed her even when she went shopping when I was little. She suffered enormously and never received justice.

The Soviet security system was centered around terror and torture. She was a very brave woman. She did what was right. More recently, I witnessed the bravery of my pianist wife, who refused to yield to Communist methods of thugs running the state apparatus in Poland. This is also a very interesting story.

The current article is part of a totalitarian narrative. Both Communists and Nazis offered important roles to women dedicated to their cause. I would recommend publishing a collection of stories of female emancipation in the service of both of these genocidal regimes.

I would like to correct those optimists who claim that Communism collapsed. It didn’t. The publishing of this and similar articles in top British papers is a testimony to Communism being pushed into the mainstream. This is the next stage. Memory of Communist villains is preserved, while their victims are eliminated again, this time from memory.

@LechSBorkowski

Research

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Political functionary as chief of the Auschwitz museum

My comment on the article Auschwitz museum chief offers to serve Nigerian boy Omar Farouq’s hard-labour sentence by Jane Flanagan in The Times, 30 September 2020.


Mr Cywiński is more of a political functionary than a museum director.

Here is part of my comment following the The Sunday Times article Holocaust novelists blur Nazi fact and fiction in bestsellers
by Andrew Holgate, 23 February 2020.

“The Museum did not invite Witold Pilecki’s son Andrzej and daughter Zofia, to the 70th anniversary of the Camp’s liquidation in 2015. Witold Pilecki was a Polish officer, who went to Auschwitz voluntarily, organised an underground resistance organisation there and sent reports about the Camp to the Polish resistance and the Polish government in exile in London.

At the same time, Museum issued an invitation to Rainer Hoess, 51, a grandson of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Camp commandant Rudolf Hoess, to participate in the 70th anniversary ceremonies. Rainer is a well-known anti-Nazi.

After WWII, Witold Pilecki was executed by the functionaries of the Communist dictatorship in 1948. This is clearly the reason behind refusing to invite Zofia and Andrzej Pilecki to the 70th anniversary. The concentration camp lives on under new leadership and with new guards. This is the camp of social death and elimination from history. The narrative is being actively managed and controlled.”

The entire comment can be found under the original article as well as in my blog.

@LechSBorkowski

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Communist narrative in The Sunday Times Travel section

My comment on the article Exploring Poland’s Lake District by Emma Thomson in The Sunday Times, 27 September 2020. Polish version: Narracja komunistyczna w The Sunday Times.


Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 27 September 2020
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times, 27 September 2020, part 1
Lech S Borkowski comment The Times 27 September 2020 part 2
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times, 27 September 2020, part 2

The article is representative of the Communist narrative. This is a region whose inhabitants either escaped or were expelled later in a totalitarian action. Practically the entire population of this large region was purged. The region was split by an arbitrarily drawn border and the Soviet enclave of “Kaliningrad” was installed north of it. The Koenigsberg of Immanuel Kant and several hundred years of history were annihilated.

“The capital of the region is the “garden town” of Olsztyn”

It is not a garden town. It is full of Communist blocks of flats. This was East Prussian Allenstein before WWII.

My wife’s grandmother Wera Głuchowska and her son Witold, my wife’s father, then a little boy, happened to be in Allenstein as refugees in 1945, just as WWII was coming to an end. Their home was in Iwacewicze, town in eastern Poland under Soviet occupation, presently under Belarussian control. Food was extremely scarce. Wera died of disease and exhaustion in 1945, after the war ended. She is buried in a neglected cemetery behind the church of St Joseph (current name, I am not sure of the German name). An office of the Polish Institute of National Remembrance is located just across the street from the church. The name is misleading, however. A short walk to this cemetery is enough to expose the lie. This has nothing to do with remembrance and everything with forgetting and subjugating to the official propaganda.

This cemetery bears witness to a great tragedy. Graves of little children who came to the world in the aftermath of WWII, graves of older Polish folk, who died in a foreign land instead near their farms in the fields, where they grew up and farmed. Graves of pre-WWII Prussian inhabitants, whose descendants fled, were killed, or were expelled. Most neglected, their boundaries sometimes difficult to recognize.

“The farm near Utka was bought by her great-grandparents for a small sum when the borders were redrawn after the Second World War. This previously German region became Polish, the Germans left, and residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south.”

The name of the place in Polish is Ukta, not Utka. It is quite an achievement to falsify so much history in two sentences. “Borders were redrawn”? By whom? Who did that? Why? No mention of an illegal Yalta agreement to which, sadly, the British government were part.

The phrase “bought by her great-grandparents” is meant to suggest a legal transaction as well as create an air of a long Polish history of the place. The sentence “This previously German region became Polish, the Germans left, and residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south” is a classic example of a totalitarian story-telling. The tragedy of the people is presented like a simple house sale. It was anything but.

This is the Communist narrative subordinated to the Soviet/Russian narrative.

The phrase “residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south” is simply a lie. I am a son of those “residents”. They were indeed residents, but not of Lithuania. Post-WWII, they resided in Communist concentration camps in northern Russia, Arkhangelsk region, for quite a long time. They were lucky to get out alive. Before that, they were citizens of Poland. They were stripped of their Polish citizenship by the Soviet occupiers. Both of my parents lived in eastern Poland, now marked as part of Belarus.

I was born in Kętrzyn/Rastenburg and grew up among refugee families from eastern Poland. We had a very small flat in former German barracks. Among our neighbours was a quiet German-East Prussian family. They may have been evicted from their house or farm. They left for Germany in the 1970s. Two of my childhood friends also moved to Germany during that time. They had a Polish father and a German mother.

As time went by, I gradually realised the enormity of the tragedy of all the people in that war.

And what are we served by The Times? No mention of vandalised country houses, ruined farms. It is all sweet and beautiful. “Bought for a small sum”. Really? This area is not my place and not my heritage.

@LechSBorkowski

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Communist narrative in The Sunday Times Travel section

My comment on the article Exploring Poland’s Lake District by Emma Thomson in The Sunday Times, 27 September 2020.


The article is representative of the Communist narrative. This is a region whose inhabitants either fled or were expelled later in a totalitarian action. Practically the entire population of this large region was purged. The region was split by an arbitrarily drawn border and the Soviet enclave of “Kaliningrad” was installed north of it. The Koenigsberg of Immanuel Kant and several hundred years of history were annihilated.

“The capital of the region is the “garden town” of Olsztyn”

It is not a garden town. It is full of Communist blocks of flats. This was East Prussian Allenstein before WWII.

My wife’s grandmother Wera Głuchowska and her son Witold, my wife’s father, then a little boy, happened to be in Allenstein as refugees in 1945, just as WWII was coming to an end. Their home was in Iwacewicze, town in eastern Poland under Soviet occupation, presently under Belarussian control. Food was extremely scarce. Wera died of disease and exhaustion in 1945, after the war ended. She is buried in a neglected cemetery behind the church of St Joseph (current name, I am not sure of the German name). An office of the Polish Institute of National Remembrance is located just across the street from the church. The name is misleading, however. A short walk to this cemetery is enough to expose the lie. This has nothing to do with remembrance and everything with forgetting and subjugating to the official propaganda.

This cemetery bears witness to a great tragedy. Graves of little children who came to the world in the aftermath of WWII, graves of older Polish folk, who died in a foreign land instead near their farms in the fields, where they grew up and farmed. Graves of pre-WWII Prussian inhabitants, whose descendants fled, were killed, or were expelled. Most neglected, their boundaries sometimes difficult to recognize.

“The farm near Utka was bought by her great-grandparents for a small sum when the borders were redrawn after the Second World War. This previously German region became Polish, the Germans left, and residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south.”

The name of the place in Polish is Ukta, not Utka. It is quite an achievement to falsify so much history in two sentences. “Borders were redrawn”? By whom? Who did that? Why? No mention of an illegal Yalta agreement to which, sadly, the British government were part.

The phrase “bought by her great-grandparents” is meant to suggest a legal transaction as well as create an air of a long Polish history of the place. The sentence “This previously German region became Polish, the Germans left, and residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south” is a classic example of a totalitarian story-telling. The tragedy of the people is presented like a simple house sale. It was anything but.

This is the Communist narrative subordinated to the Soviet/Russian narrative.

The phrase “residents from modern-day Lithuania moved south” is simply a lie. I am a son of those “residents”. They were indeed residents, but not of Lithuania. Post-WWII, they resided in Communist concentration camps in northern Russia, Arkhangelsk region, for quite a long time. They were lucky to get out alive. Before that, they were citizens of Poland. They were stripped of their Polish citizenship by the Soviet occupiers. Both of my parents lived in eastern Poland, now marked as part of Belarus.

I was born in Kętrzyn/Rastenburg and grew up among refugee families from eastern Poland. We had a very small flat in former German barracks. Among our neighbours was a quiet German-East Prussian family. They may have been evicted from their house or farm. They left for Germany in the 1970s. Two of my childhood friends also moved to Germany during that time. They had a Polish father and a German mother.

As time went by, I gradually realised the enormity of the tragedy of all the people in that war.

And what are we served by The Times? No mention of vandalised country houses, ruined farms. It is all sweet and beautiful. “Bought for a small sum”. Really? This area is not my place and not my heritage.

@LechSBorkowski

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Static vs dynamic dictatorship

My comment on the article Hackers identify Belarus’s masked security police to pressure President Lukashenko by Marc Bennetts in The Times, 21 September 2020. Polish translation of the comment: Dyktatura statyczna czy dynamiczna.


Lech S Borkowski, comment The Times 21 September 2020
Lech S Borkowski, comment in The Times 21 September 2020

Communist dictatorship controls all spheres of life. Private life is eliminated. You cannot trust anyone. There is no social capital.

What we are seeing is an attempt to make a transition into the next stage, which is fake democracy, equally well controlled but with democratic decorations on the outside. This slow motion spectacle in Belarus is served to engage the West. In other words, it is a provocation. For provocation to work the targeted side must engage. If it does, the provoking side can execute further steps, adjusting their actions as needed on a day-by-day basis.

Western media avoid serving any background information, reporting instead on the pure mechanics of demonstrations. Occasionally, only occasionally, there is a quantum of interesting information, like the participation of a former minister of culture in an ‘opposition’ committee. This is the regime actually telling you in capital letters: guys, this is FAKE!

These are very old tricks. They have been played many times before.

I have been a first-year chemistry student in Poland in 1981 and participated in occupation of university buildings at the Copernicus University in Toruń during one of many protests. This was an empty spectacle, as I gradually learned later. The Solidarity movement was fake and totally controlled by the Communist regime. It was organised by them. In fact, standard Communist methods are in use in Poland today.

It is quite easy to be duped when information is very limited. Usually, people believe that mass demonstrations are authentic. They believe in a static dictatorship and cannot comprehend that the regime could be much more innovative and creative.

@LechSBorkowski

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Vatican in the Shadow of the Red Star

My comment on the article Pope Francis ‘naive’ in deal with China to name bishops by Tom Kington and Didi Tang in The Times, 19 September 2020. Polish translation: Czerwona gwiazda nad Watykanem.


This is nothing new in the Vatican. Earlier popes appeased Communists in Eastern Europe in a similar way. It was done under the banner of ‘normalization’. It is worth reading “Memoirs” of Jozsef Mindszenty, the Hungarian cardinal who never bowed to the Communists. He described how the Communist regime was taking over the control over the Catholic Church in Hungary after WWII. Something very similar was done in other Communist countries.

Mindszenty was eventually stripped of his cardinal dignity for his resistance to Communist rule by pope Paul VI himself. Shocking and disgusting, if you ask me. Cardinal Casaroli was then making rounds between Rome and Communist capitals in Eastern Europe and making deals with them, sealing the Communist control of the church affairs.

The election of Karol Wojtyła from Poland as pope John Paul II in 1978 extended direct Communist control to the Vatican. Wojtyła was not opposing Communists. He was working with them and for them. Otherwise he would be eliminated early on.

Later, the legend of Wojtyła’s opposition to Communism was fabricated. Utter nonsense. John Paul II celebrated the 26th anniversary of his pontificate with a Red Army Choir’s concert in the Paul VI auditorium in the Vatican on October 15, 2004. The last song performed that evening was “Oka”, the anthem of the Communist First Division formed in the Soviet Union in 1943. The concert was broadcast on tv to Italy and Russia. BBC and some other media reported on the concert, but nobody expressed any surprise or feelings of unease over the concert. The “Oka” song was not mentioned publicly as well. The Italian announcer introduced it simply as a ‘Polish song’.

The subsequent turbo-propelled extra quick canonization of John Paul II is not a result of divine interventions. It was his Communist comrades who did the job. A posthumous life achievement award for his services.

Polish émigré writer Józef Mackiewicz wrote a book entitled “Vatican Under the Shadow of the Red Star”, Watykan w Cieniu Czerwonej Gwiazdy, in the 1970s. I don’t think there is an English translation of it though.

@LechSBorkowski

  • József Cardinal Mindszenty, Memoirs, New York: Macmillan (1974)
  • Józef Mackiewicz, Watykan w Cieniu Czerwonej Gwiazdy.
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All the Pravda

“All the Pravda That’s Fit to Print”. My comments on the article Meet Maroš Šefčovič, the steely former communist who imposed the EU’s Brexit deadline by James Crisp in The Telegraph, 11 September 2020.


This article reads like The London Pravda. Let’s see…

towering, basketball-loving, polyglot, wise choice, embroiled in tough trilateral negotiations, won plaudits from all sides, managed to negotiate a solution in highly challenging circumstances, dealing with untrustworthy Russia, ideal preparation, safe pair of hands, his ability to whip through briefings and his laser-like eye for detail, cheerful, friendly approach, he was all steel, big hitter, a well-prepared and formidable opponent

Note this: “Dealing with an untrustworthy Russia”, the country he obtained his degree from.

The following is characteristic of the Communist school:

‘has an unfailing habit of referring to Mr Gove (see video below), the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, as either “Mike” or the “Chancellor”.’

In essence, EU Commission vice-president is a towering Communist figure with a degree from an untrustworthy country.

@LechSBorkowski


Lech Borkowski 12 Sep 2020 8:03AM

“Former Communist” is an oxymoron. Something like a “Russian data security company”

@LechSBorkowski

https://lsborkowski.com/pol/

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Onwards to simulated democracy

My comment on the article Putin offers cash but cold comfort to President Lukashenko of Belarus by Marc Bennetts in The Times, 15 September 2020.


Generally speaking, the western observers do not know how deep and how thorough is the control of the Communist dictatorship, and how deep and common is the fear of doing anything against the authorities. The only people in Belarus who have some memory of living in a different kind of country are around 90 years old, those who have been born in Poland before WWII.

Belarus is a Communist creation. Demonstrations and the entire spectacle is not a sign of discontent. It is a demonstration of the regime’s strength. Communists are not stupid. They understand more than people give them credit for. Their intention is to progress to the next phase, which is a simulated democracy, while creating something of a founding myth for this next stage. This has been done in Poland with the Solidarity trade union and the rest of the fake opposition in the 1970 and 1980s.

Been there, seen that.

@LechSBorkowski

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On the Communist modus operandi

My comment on the article Opposition figurehead Maria Kolesnikova is bundled into van in Belarus by Gareth Browne in The Times, 7 September 2020.


Fake event. The story does not fit the Communist modus operandi. There is no need to grab someone from the street like that. The Communist way is to socially murder the person long before he or she becomes well known. There are many ways to do it. It need not involve physical contact, while being extremely perfidious and cruel.

My wife and I have been targeted for years in Poland. Those activities are run in an entirely different way. My wife and I were eventually expelled from our jobs in Poland in 2015. The authorities ordered the local branch of the Occupational Medical Service to issue a fake statement proclaiming my wife to be unable to work as a pianist due to some unspecified ‘delusions’. That’s the Communist way to do it. My wife was promptly fired. Not even one person expressed support for us. Neither officially, nor privately.

Western journalists generally have no clue about realities of everyday life under the regime. They also do not understand that the regime has total control of the entire public narrative, including the fake opposition. ‘Opposition’ in Belarus does not even pretend it has a program. Their slogan ‘Country to live in’ is perfectly suitable for Lukashenko as well. Demands of Lukashenko stepping down is exactly what the Communist political technologists want. It is a bit like staging demonstrations in winter to demand the end of the cold season and arrival of spring and summer.

This is really a polit-soap opera. Everyone knows that they need to replace Lukashenko eventually with someone else. No one lives forever. They are not stupid. The trick is to pretend he has been overthrown or stepped down as a result of public pressure and create a bit of mythology in the process.

The way to confuse the West is to arrange a fake conflict and pretend the fake opposition won, like the Solidarity trade union in Poland in the 1980s. The same ruling class continued to run the show post-1990 with the West’s approval, thanks in no small part to journalists who did everything to avoid asking inconvenient questions.

@LechSBorkowski

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Pret a imprimer

My comment on the article Hard rain as 100,000 defy autocrat’s police in Belarus by Gareth Browne in The Times, 7 September 2020.


The ‘protests’ occur, because that’s what political technologists agreed on. The Communist dictatorship has been painstakingly built over several generations by now. It is very well oiled and controlled in all spheres of life. It doesn’t need to project a ‘1984’ image.

The trick is to make people outside, especially in the West, believe that change is taking place.

Journalists get a pret a imprimer story. Everyone seems to be happy. So happy, that a woman protest leader is strolling happily among waiting journalists, as if on a catwalk. Face happy. All smiles.

No tear gas, no quick dispersal of protesters. If you were running a dictatorship, I am pretty sure you would mobilize your forces to quickly suppress dissent.

Journalists ask no questions. They don’t even try. They don’t want to know and they make this decision apparently with the approval of their editors. The media are happy with the spectacle.

However, this is merely a spectacle, a performance. You are watching an open air theatre play. This spectacle is not about Lukashenko. It is about western media and the fairy tales they will print.

Thomas theorem: if men define situations as real, they are real in their consequences.

@LechSBorkowski

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