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Concentration camp Poland

My third comment following the article Benefits boom pushes Polish populists to victory by Oliver Moody in The Times, 14 October 2019.


This is a response to those uncritically accepting the well-known widely publicized narrative.

To present a narrative, especially one contrary to the widely publicized one, it does take a little longer to experience, analyze and assess. And I and my wife have done that. We have documents and texts to show for it.

The Communist devil is in the details. The necessary condition is to think critically, ask questions, verify, interact with the authorities by e.g. writing letters etc.

I recommend reading our texts at lsborkowski.com/pol/

They are available for everyone to see.

We also have some sound recordings. At the top of my Twitter feed is currently pinned a sound clip from my visit to the Ministry of Culture in Warsaw, Center for Artistic Education, 23 October 2012. This was at the time when Donald Tusk was the Prime Minister and another former ‘dissident’ and a recent MEP Bogdan Zdrojewski was the Minister of Culture. One of the lawyers in the legal section of the Center threatened me with hurting my ‘paws’ during my attempt to make notes during the few minutes when I had access to a document produced by a representative of the Ministry.

We documented falsifications and violations of law. We also raised our voice against it.

We were both expelled from our jobs in the Autumn of 2015, my wife from the State School of Music in Zielona Góra and I from the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań for contradicting the imposed fake narrative, for using our rights theoretically declared in the constitution of 1997.

My wife, the best piano teacher in the School’s piano section, with many professional achievements, was declared to be psychologically unfit for the job. After twenty years of an impeccable and a very successful service. The authorities used against her a typical Communist method. The Communist Labor Code introduced in 1974, contains provision for compulsory health checks by the specialized branch of the health service: Occupational Health Service.

In 1996, the Minister of Health issued an ordinance allowing the functionaries of the Occupational Health Service to request unspecified and unrestricted additional health checks. The employee is not allowed to continue in his/her current occupation, unless he or she shows an approval from the Occupational Health Service. Much like in a concentration camp. The camp physician decides, whether you can continue to work, and therefore to live, or whether you should be fired and your life ought to be terminated.

Why such an obvious totalitarian tool escaped attention of journalists, scholars, politicians? We sent hundreds of letters to the top officials and MPs in Poland and have not received a single meaningful answer.

My wife was forced to go to a psychologist under the threat of losing her job. Everyone knows that there is no method to assess psychologically whether someone is fit for the job of a pianist and piano teacher. After two approximately 40-45 minute conversations the psychologist issued an ‘opinion’ that Malgorzata Gluchowska suffers from unspecified delusions and is unfit for the job she performed so successfully for over twenty years. Sounds like the Soviet Union, doesn’t it?

We have got sound recordings of these conversations. We have sent transcripts to the authorities. We sent it to the Prime Minister Morawiecki, the Prosecutor General Zbigniew Ziobro, to other members of the cabinet and to the MPs. You can read the transcript online. Part of recording is also available there. And the entire recording is ready to be used in the criminal proceedings against the members of the Occupational Medical Service as well as against other members of the state hierarchy. The state’s top officials protect criminals masquerading as a health service.

It is obvious that this action had the approval and protection at the very top. The participants must have been assured of impunity and of being rewarded for it, otherwise they wouldn’t have dared to undertake such a bold action.

The prosecuting authority falsified the proceedings in a typical Communist manner.

My parents were imprisoned in Communist concentration camps in the Soviet Union for their convictions and standing up against it. My father deserted from the Communist army in January 1945. He was sentenced by the NKVD War Tribunal to ten years in the camp. My mother’s family supported anti-Communist resistance in Eastern Poland, which was occupied by the Soviet Union after 1944. She was imprisoned from 1949 to 1956. That was real opposition to Communism.

The Solidarity trade union and other ‘opposition’ movements of the 1970s and the 1980s in Poland were fake.

@LechSBorkowski

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Labour of the many, not the few

My comment on Marc Bennett’s article Elite Russian spy unit ‘given job of sowing chaos in Europe’ in The Times, 10 October 2019.


The western thinking goes along the lines of specialized units and members of intelligence, while ignoring other enduring aspects of the legacy of the Communist dictatorship.

Vyacheslav Molotov proclaimed in the 1930s: “Every toiler a security agent”. He also said that millions were helping in the work of the Soviet intelligence.

The system relied on millions of prying eyes. The whole Communist criminal state was one big intelligence agency, not just in the Soviet Union, but in each of the Communist countries.

Has this really changed? I don’t think so.

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OGPU and the army

Ben MacIntyre’s article Did MI6 let Cold War spy Kim Philby escape to Moscow? in The Times, 28 September 2019. Here is my comment posted on the newspaper’s website.


[Kim Philby:] I joined the OGPU as one joined the army.

This sort of argument is consistent with what apparently was routine Communist intelligence training in presenting a personal narrative.

I have the personal misfortune to be a brother in law of an officer working for the Polish Communist Ministry of Internal Affairs, Jerzy Skwarczyński, a graduate of a military school. He appeared in our family in 1979, when he married my older sister. I was still in high school then. Professionalism, patriotism and subordination of an army type were part of the story. The problem was that both of my parents were former inmates of Communist concentration camps. But they couldn’t do much about their daughter’s choice.

Today, I know beyond any doubt that both my sister and my brother in law continually worked against me and against my parents, not only before 1990, but the whole time after that. When I got married, this was extended to my own family as well.

The apologetic argument of either following orders or working for a greater good frequently comes up, whenever someone’s ties to Communist intelligence or Communist party are discussed. So, Philby’s statement to this effect is nothing really new and nothing surprising.

@LechSBorkowski

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